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Heiden, Jasmin; Völkner, Christian; Jones, Elizabeth M; van De Poll, Willem H; Buma, Anita G J; Meredith, Michael P; de Baar, Hein J W; Bischof, Kai; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A; Trimborn, Scarlett (2019): Seawater carbonate chemistry and productivity and species composition of a late summer phytoplankton community of the coastal Western Antarctic Peninsula. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.907767, Supplement to: Heiden, J et al. (2019): Impact of ocean acidification and high solar radiation on productivity and species composition of a late summer phytoplankton community of the coastal Western Antarctic Peninsula. Limnology and Oceanography, 64(4), 1716-1736, https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.11147

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Abstract:
The Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP), one of the most productive regions of the Southern Ocean, is currently undergoing rapid environmental changes such as ocean acidification (OA) and increased daily irradiances from enhanced surface‐water stratification. To assess the potential for future biological CO2 sequestration of this region, we incubated a natural phytoplankton assemblage from Ryder Bay, WAP, under a range of pCO2 levels (180 μatm, 450 μatm, and 1000 μatm) combined with either moderate or high natural solar radiation (MSR: 124 μmol photons/m**2/s and HSR: 435 μmol photons/ m**2/s, respectively). The initial and final phytoplankton communities were numerically dominated by the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis antarctica, with the single cells initially being predominant and solitary and colonial cells reaching similar high abundances by the end. Only when communities were grown under ambient pCO2 in conjunction with HSR did the small diatom Fragilariopsis pseudonana outcompete P. antarctica at the end of the experiment. Such positive light‐dependent growth response of the diatom was, however, dampened by OA. These changes in community composition were caused by an enhanced photosensitivity of diatoms, especially F. pseudonana, under OA and HSR, reducing thereby their competitiveness toward P. antarctica. Moreover, community primary production (PP) of all treatments yielded similar high rates at the start and the end of the experiment, but with the main contributors shifting from initially large to small cells toward the end. Even though community PP of Ryder Bay phytoplankton was insensitive to the changes in light and CO2 availability, the observed size‐dependent shift in productivity could, however, weaken the biological CO2 sequestration potential of this region in the future.
Keyword(s):
Antarctic; Biomass/Abundance/Elemental composition; Bottles or small containers/Aquaria (<20 L); Community composition and diversity; Entire community; Growth/Morphology; Laboratory experiment; Light; Open ocean; Pelagos; Polar; Primary production/Photosynthesis
Further details:
Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Epitalon, Jean-Marie; Lavigne, Héloise; Orr, James C; Gentili, Bernard; Hagens, Mathilde; Hofmann, Andreas; Mueller, Jens-Daniel; Proye, Aurélien; Rae, James; Soetaert, Karline (2019): seacarb: seawater carbonate chemistry with R. R package version 3.2.12. https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=seacarb
Coverage:
Latitude: -67.570000 * Longitude: -68.225000
Date/Time Start: 2015-02-11T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2015-02-11T00:00:00
Event(s):
Rothera_OA * Latitude: -67.570000 * Longitude: -68.225000 * Date/Time: 2015-02-11T00:00:00 * Method/Device: Experiment (EXP)
Comment:
In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2019) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation by seacarb is 2019-10-24.
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethod/DeviceComment
1TypeTypeTrimborn, Scarlettstudy
2Time point, descriptiveTime pointTrimborn, Scarlett
3TreatmentTreatTrimborn, Scarlettlight
4TreatmentTreatTrimborn, Scarlett
5Carbon/Nitrogen ratioC/NTrimborn, Scarlett
6Carbon/Nitrogen ratio, standard deviationC/N std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
7Particulate organic carbon productionPOC prodµg/dayTrimborn, Scarlett
8Particulate organic carbon, production, standard deviationPOC prod std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
9Chlorophyll a/particulate organic carbon ratioChl a/POCTrimborn, Scarlett
10Chlorophyll a/particulate organic carbon ratio, standard deviationChl a/POC std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
11(Diadinoxanthin plus Diatoxanthin)/Chlorophyll a ratio(Diadino + Diato)/Chl aTrimborn, Scarlett
12(Diadinoxanthin plus Diatoxanthin)/Chlorophyll a ratio, standard deviation(Diadino + Diato)/Chl a std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
13Phosphate[PO4]3-µmol/lTrimborn, Scarlett
14Thymidine uptake rate, standard deviationThym upt rate std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
15SilicateSi(OH)4µmol/lTrimborn, Scarlett
16Silicate, standard deviationSi(OH)4 std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
17Cell densityCells#/mlTrimborn, Scarlett
18Cell density, standard deviationCells std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
19Net primary production of carbon per particulate organic carbonNPP C/POCnmol/µmol/hTrimborn, Scarlettwhole community
20Primary production of carbon, standard deviationPP C std dev±Trimborn, Scarlettwhole community
21Net primary production of carbon per particulate organic carbonNPP C/POCnmol/µmol/hTrimborn, Scarlettlarge cells
22Primary production of carbon, standard deviationPP C std dev±Trimborn, Scarlettlarge cells
23Net primary production of carbon per particulate organic carbonNPP C/POCnmol/µmol/hTrimborn, Scarlettsmall cells
24Primary production of carbon, standard deviationPP C std dev±Trimborn, Scarlettsmall cells
25SpeciesSpeciesTrimborn, Scarlett
26AbundanceAbund%Trimborn, Scarlett
27Growth rateµ1/dayTrimborn, Scarlett
28Growth rate, standard deviationµ std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
29SalinitySalTrimborn, Scarlett
30Temperature, waterTemp°CTrimborn, Scarlett
31Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmTrimborn, Scarlett
32Partial pressure of carbon dioxide, standard deviationpCO2 std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
33Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgTrimborn, Scarlett
34Carbon, inorganic, dissolved, standard deviationDIC std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
35Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgTrimborn, Scarlett
36Alkalinity, total, standard deviationAT std dev±Trimborn, Scarlett
37pHpHTrimborn, ScarlettNBS scale
38pH, standard deviationpH std dev±Trimborn, ScarlettNBS scale
39Carbonate system computation flagCSC flagYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
40pHpHYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)total scale
41Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
42Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
43Fugacity of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)fCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
44Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
45Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
46Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
47Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
48Calcite saturation stateOmega CalYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
Size:
3185 data points

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