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Herenz, Paul; Wex, Heike; Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; Gorodetskaya, Irina V; Fleming, Zoë L; Panagi, Marios; Stratmann, Frank (2018): Meteorological observations and condensation nuclei measurements at the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica Research Station during three austral summers. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894841, Supplement to: Herenz, P et al. (2019): CCN measurements at the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica research station during three austral summers. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 19(1), 275-294, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-275-2019

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Abstract:
For three austral summer seasons (2013-2016, each from December to February) aerosol particles arriving at the Belgian Antarctic research station Princess Elisabeth (PE), in Dronning Maud Land in East Antarctica were characterized. This included number concentrations of total aerosol particles (N[CN]) and cloud condensation nuclei (N[CCN]), the particle number size distribution (PNSD), the aerosol particle hygroscopicity and the influence of the air mass origin on N[CN] and N[CCN]. In general N[CN] was found to range from 40 to 6700 cm^-3 with a median of 333 cm^-3, while N[CCN] was found to cover a range between less than 10 and 1300 cm^-3 for supersaturations (SS) between 0.1 and 0.7%. It is shown that the aerosol is Aitken mode dominated, being characterized by a significant amount of small, and therefore likely secondarily formed aerosol particles, with 94% and 36% of the aerosol particles smaller than 90 nm and ~35 nm, respectively. Measurements of the basic meteorological parameters as well as the history of the air masses arriving at the measurement station indicate that the station is influenced by both, marine air masses originating from the Southern Ocean and coastal areas around Antarctica (marine events - MEs) and continental air masses (continental events - CEs). CEs, which were defined as times when the air masses spent at least 90% of the time during the last 10 days over the Antarctic continent, occurred during 61% of the time during which measurements were done. CEs came along with rather constant N[CN] and N[CCN] values, which we denote to be Antarctic continental background concentrations. MEs however cause large fluctuations in N[CN] and N[CCN] with low concentrations likely caused by scavenging due to precipitation and high concentrations likely originating from new particle formation (NPF) based on marine precursors. The application of HYSPLIT back trajectories in form of the potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis indicate, that the region of the Southern Ocean is a potential source of Aitken mode particles. On the basis of PNSDs, together with N[CCN] measured at a SS of 0.1%, median values for the critical diameter for cloud droplet activation and the aerosol particle hygroscopicity parameter were determined to be 110nm and 1, respectively. For particles larger than ~110nm the Southern Ocean together with parts of the Antarctic ice shelf regions were found to be potential source regions. While the former may contribute sea spray particles directly, contribution of the latter may be due to the emission of sea salt aerosol particles, released from snow particles from surface snow layers, e.g., during periods of high wind speed, leading to drifting or blowing snow. The region of the Antarctic inland plateau however was not found to feature a significant source region for CN and CCN measured at the PE station in austral summer.
Coverage:
Latitude: -71.950000 * Longitude: 23.347000
Date/Time Start: 2013-12-01T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2016-02-20T23:30:00
Event(s):
PE_Station (Princess Elisabeth Station) * Latitude: -71.950000 * Longitude: 23.347000 * Elevation: 1390.0 m * Location: Antarctica * Method/Device: Monitoring station (MONS)
Size:
19 datasets

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Datasets listed in this publication series

  1. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 02) Meteorological time series at Princess Elisabeth Station in 2013-2016. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894820
  2. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 02) Daily precipitation at Princess Elisabeth Station in 2013-2016. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894821
  3. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 05) Total monthly particle number concentration between 2012-2016. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894822
  4. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 06) Particle number size distributions between 90 nm and 1 μm (first season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894823
  5. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 06) Cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (first season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894825
  6. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 06) Condensation nuclei concentrations measured by CPC 3776 (first season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894826
  7. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 06) Condensation nuclei concentrations measured by LAS (first season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894827
  8. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 06) Proportions air masses spend over different regions (first season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894828
  9. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 07) Particle number size distributions between 90 nm and 1 μm (second season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894829
  10. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 07) Cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (second season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894844
  11. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 07) Condensation nuclei concentrations measured by CPC 3776 (second season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894831
  12. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 07) Condensation nuclei concentrations measured by LAS (second season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894833
  13. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 07) Proportions air masses spend over different regions (second season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894834
  14. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 08) Particle number size distributions between 90 nm and 1 μm (third season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894835
  15. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 08) Cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (third season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894836
  16. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 08) Condensation nuclei concentrations measured by CPC 3776 (third season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894837
  17. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 08) Condensation nuclei concentrations measured by LAS (third season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894838
  18. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 08) Proportions air masses spend over different regions (third season). https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894839
  19. Herenz, P; Wex, H; Mangold, A et al. (2018): (Figure 12) Kappa-values of all three seasons. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.894840