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Mitzscherling, Julia; Winkel, Matthias; Winterfeld, Maria; Horn, Fabian; Yang, Sizhong; Grigoriev, Mikhail N; Wagner, Dirk; Overduin, Pier Paul; Liebner, Susanne (2017): Pore water chemistry and sediment temperature for cores COAST_C-2 and BK-2, central Laptev Sea shelf. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.873837, Supplement to: Mitzscherling, J et al. (2017): The development of permafrost bacterial communities under submarine conditions. Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, 122(7), 1689-1704, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017JG003859

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Abstract:
Submarine permafrost is more vulnerable to thawing than permafrost on land. Besides increased heat transfer from the ocean water, the penetration of salt lowers the freezing temperature and accelerates permafrost degradation. This data set provides sediment temperatures and pore water chemistry from two submarine permafrost cores from the Laptev Sea on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf which inundated about 540 and 2500 years ago. These data are published in partnership with a paper by Magritz et al., that traces how bacterial communities develop depending on duration of the marine influence and pore water chemistry. Magritz et al. (2017) show that submarine permafrost is a source of microbial life deep below the seafloor where it forms an unusual, non-steady state habitat. Pore water chemistry revealed different pore water units that reflected stages of permafrost thaw. Millennia after inundation by sea water, bacteria stratify into communities in permafrost, marine-affected permafrost, and seabed sediments. In contrast to pore water chemistry, the development of bacterial community structure, diversity and abundance in submarine permafrost appear site-specific, suggesting that both sedimentation and permafrost thaw histories strongly affect bacteria. Finally, highest total cell counts, DNA concentrations and bacterial gene copy numbers were observed in the ice-bonded unaffected permafrost unit of the longer inundated core, suggesting that permafrost bacterial communities exposed to submarine conditions proliferate millennia after warming.
Related to:
Overduin, Pier Paul; Liebner, Susanne; Knoblauch, Christian; Günther, Frank; Wetterich, Sebastian; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Hubberten, Hans-Wolfgang; Grigoriev, Mikhail N (2015): Borehole temperature, submarine permafrost methane concentrations and pore water chemistry measured on borehole BK-2, central Laptev Sea shelf. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.846279
Overduin, Pier Paul; Liebner, Susanne; Knoblauch, Christian; Günther, Frank; Wetterich, Sebastian; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Hubberten, Hans-Wolfgang; Grigoriev, Mikhail N (2015): Submarine permafrost methane concentrations and pore water chemistry: measurements from borehole BK-2, central Laptev Sea shelf. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.846274
Winterfeld, Maria; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Grigoriev, Mikhail N; Kunitsky, Victor V; Andreev, Andrei A; Murray, Andrew S; Overduin, Pier Paul (2011): (Table 1) Radiocarbon and OSL ages of sediment cores C1-C5 drilled during the COAST expedition to Cape Mamontov Klyk in April 2005. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.841929
Coverage:
Median Latitude: 72.566164 * Median Longitude: 124.625886 * South-bound Latitude: 71.422300 * West-bound Longitude: 117.166972 * North-bound Latitude: 73.710028 * East-bound Longitude: 132.084800
Date/Time Start: 2005-04-14T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2012-04-23T00:00:00
Size:
2 datasets

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