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Hennige, Sebastian; Wicks, L C; Kamenos, N A; Bakker, Dorothee C E; Findlay, Helen S; Dumousseaud, C; Roberts, J Murray (2013): Short-term metabolic and growth responses of the cold-water coral lophelia pertusa to ocean acidification. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.820339, Supplement to: Hennige, S et al. (2014): Short-term metabolic and growth responses of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa to ocean acidification. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, 99, 27-35, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2013.07.005

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Abstract:
Cold-water corals are amongst the most three-dimensionally complex deep-sea habitats known and are associated with high local biodiversity. Despite their importance as ecosystem engineers, little is known about how these organisms will respond to projected ocean acidification. Since preindustrial times, average ocean pH has already decreased from 8.2 to ~ 8.1. Predicted CO2 emissions will decrease this by up to another 0.3 pH units by the end of the century. This decrease in pH may have a wide range of impacts upon marine life, and in particular upon calcifiers such as cold-water corals. Lophelia pertusa is the most widespread cold-water coral (CWC) species, frequently found in the North Atlantic. Data here relate to a short term data set (21 days) on metabolism and net calcification rates of freshly collected L. pertusa from Mingulay Reef Complex, Scotland. These data from freshly collected L. pertusa from the Mingulay Reef Complex will help define the impact of ocean acidification upon the growth, physiology and structural integrity of this key reef framework forming species.
Original version:
Hennige, Sebastian; Wicks, L C; Roberts, J Murray (2012): Short-Term Responses of the Cold Water Coral Lophelia Pertusa to Ocean Acidification. British Oceanographic Data Cente, Natural Environment Research Council, https://doi.org/10.5285/a931a96d-f08d-4e7d-af30-866f5e3e8fd8
Further details:
Lavigne, Héloise; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre (2011): seacarb: seawater carbonate chemistry with R. R package version 2.4. https://cran.r-project.org/package=seacarb
Coverage:
Latitude: 56.823000 * Longitude: -7.376000
Date/Time Start: 2011-07-01T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2011-07-30T00:00:00
Event(s):
Mingulayreef * Latitude: 56.823000 * Longitude: -7.376000 * Date/Time Start: 2011-07-01T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2011-07-30T00:00:00 * Device: Experiment (EXP)
Comment:
In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Lavigne and Gattuso, 2011) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation by seacarb is 2013-10-13.
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethodComment
1SpeciesSpeciesHennige, Sebastian
2Incubation durationInc durdaysHennige, Sebastian
3Respiration rate, oxygenResp O2µmol/mg/hHennige, Sebastian
4Respiration rate, oxygen, standard deviationResp O2 std dev±Hennige, Sebastian
5Respiration rate, oxygen, standard errorResp O2 std e±Hennige, Sebastian
6Calcification rate of calcium carbonateCalc rate CaCO3µmol/g/hHennige, SebastianAlkalinity anomaly technique (Smith and Key, 1975)
7Calcification rate, standard errorCalc rate std e±Hennige, SebastianAlkalinity anomaly technique (Smith and Key, 1975)
8Growth rateµ%/dayHennige, Sebastian
9Growth rate, standard errorµ std e±Hennige, Sebastian
10Polyp numberPolyp no#Hennige, Sebastian
11Tissue, dry massTis DMmgHennige, Sebastian
12Respiration rate, oxygenResp O2µmol/hHennige, Sebastian
13SalinitySalHennige, Sebastian
14Temperature, waterTemp°CHennige, Sebastian
15Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgHennige, Sebastian
16Carbon, inorganic, dissolved, standard deviationDIC std dev±Hennige, Sebastian
17Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmHennige, Sebastian
18Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgHennige, SebastianCalculated using CO2SYS
19Alkalinity, total, standard deviationAT std dev±Hennige, SebastianCalculated using CO2SYS
20Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgHennige, SebastianCalculated using CO2SYS
21Aragonite saturation state, standard deviationOmega Arg std dev±Hennige, SebastianCalculated using CO2SYS
22pHpHHennige, SebastianCalculated using CO2SYStotal scale
23pH, standard deviationpH std dev±Hennige, SebastianCalculated using CO2SYS
24Carbonate system computation flagCSC flagYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
25pHpHYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)total scale
26Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
27Fugacity of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)fCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
28Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
29Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
30Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
31Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
32Calcite saturation stateOmega CalYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
Size:
1107 data points

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