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Boersma, Anne (1986): Benthic foraminifera in Tertiary sediments of DSDP Leg 90 holes. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810705, Supplement to: Boersma, A (1986): Biostratigraphy and biogeography of Tertiary bathyal benthic foraminifers: Tasman Sea, Coral Sea, and on the Chatham Rise (Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 90). In: Kennett, JP; von der Borch, CC; et al. (eds.), Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Washington (U.S. Govt. Printing Office), 90, 961-1035, https://doi.org/10.2973/dsdp.proc.90.120.1986

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Abstract:
Eocene through Pliocene benthic foraminifers were examined from seven sites located at middle and lower bathyal depths on the Lord Howe Rise in the Tasman Sea, from another site at lower bathyal depths in the Coral Sea, and from a site in the intermediate-depth, hemipelagic province of the Chatham Rise, east of southern New Zealand. Age-related, depth-related, and bioprovincial faunal variations are documented in this chapter. One new species, Rectuvigerina tasmana, is named. The paleoecologic indications of several key groups, including the miliolids, uvigerinids, nuttallitids, and cibicidids, are combined with sedimentologic and stable isotopic tracers to interpret paleoceanographic changes in the Tasman Sea.
Because the total stratigraphic ranges of many bathyal benthic foraminifers are not yet known, most endpoints in the Tasman Sea are considered ecologically controlled events. The disappearances of Uvigerina rippensis and Cibicidoidesparki and the first appearances of U. pigmaea, Sphaeroidina bulloides, and Rotaliatina sulcigera at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary can be considered evolutionary events, as also can the first appearance of Cibicides wuellerstorfi in Zone NN5.
Species which are restricted to the lower bathyal zone except during discrete pulses, most of which are related to the development of glacial conditions, include Melonis pompilioides, M. sphaeroides, Pullenia quinqueloba, Nuttallides umbonifera, and U. hispido-costata. Middle bathyal indigenes include U. spinulosa, U. gemmaeformis, Ehrenbergina marwicki, R. sulcigera, and all rectuvigerinids except Rectuvigerina spinea. Although the miliolids first occurred at lower bathyal depths, they were more common in the middle bathyal zone. Although the Neogene hispido-costate uvigerinids first developed at lower bathyal depths and at higher middle latitude sites, in the later Neogene this group migrated to shallower depths and became predominant also in the middle bathyal zone.
Despite the relatively similar sedimentologic settings at the six middle bathyal Tasman sites, there was extensive intrageneric and intraspecific geographic variation. Mililiolids, strongly ornamented brizalinids, bolivinitids, Bulimina aculeata, Osangularia culter, and strongly porous morphotypes were more common at higher latitudes. Osangularia bengalensis, striate brizalinids such as Brizalina subaenariensis, Gaudryina solida, osangularids in general, and finely porous morphotypes were more common in the subtropics. There was strong covariance between faunas at lower middle latitude, lower bathyal Site 591, and higher middle latitude, middle bathyal Site 593. The following oceanographic history of the Tasman Sea is proposed; using the stable isotopic record as evidence for glacials and examining the ecologic correlations between (1) miliolids and carbonate saturation, (2) nuttallitids and undersaturated, cooled, or "new" water masses, (3) uvigerinids with high organic carbon in the sediment and high rates of sediment accumulation, and (4) cibicidids and terrestrial organic carbon. The glacial located near the Eocene/Oligocene boundary is characterized by the penetration of cooler, more corrosive waters at intermediate depths in high southern latitudes. This may have caused overturn, upwelling pulses, in other Tasman areas. The development of Neogenelike conditions began in the late Oligocene (Zone NP24/NP25) with the evolution of several common Neogene species. A large number of Paleogene benthics disappeared gradually through the course of the early Miocene, which was not well preserved at any Tasman site. Corrosive conditions shallowed into the middle bathyal zone in several pulses during the early Miocene.
The development of glacial conditions in the middle Miocene was accompanied by major changes throughout the Tasman Sea. Sediment accumulation rates increased and high-productivity faunas and corrosive conditions developed at all but the lowest-latitude Site 588. This increase in productivity and accumulation rate is attributed to the eutrophication of Antarctic water masses feeding Tasman current systems, as well as to invigorated circulation in general. It overlaps with the beginning of the Pacific High-productivity Episode (10-5 Ma). During the latest Miocene glacial episode, corrosive conditions developed at lower bathyal depths, while cooler water and lower nutrient levels shallowed to middle bathyal depths. Lower input of terrestrial organic carbon may be related to the lower nutrient levels of this time and to the termination of the Pacific High-productivity Episode.
The moderate glacial episode during the mid-Pliocene (Zone NN15/NN16, ~3.2 Ma) corresponds to a decline in sediment accumulation rates and a reorganization of faunas unlike that of all other times. New genera proliferate and indices for cool, noncorrosive conditions and high organic carbon expand throughout the middle bathyal zone coeval with the sedimentation rate decreases. By the latest Pliocene (about 2.5 Ma), however, during another glacial episode, faunal patterns typical of this and later glacials develop throughout the Tasman Sea. Benthic foraminiferal patterns suggest increased input of terrestrial organic matter to Tasman Sea sediments during this episode and during later glacials.
Project(s):
Coverage:
Median Latitude: -31.785059 * Median Longitude: 165.456575 * South-bound Latitude: -45.523500 * West-bound Longitude: 158.498200 * North-bound Latitude: -0.497300 * East-bound Longitude: 174.948000
Date/Time Start: 1982-11-19T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 1983-01-03T00:00:00
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22 datasets

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Datasets listed in this publication series

  1. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 1) Benthic foraminifera in late Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 89-586B. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810682
  2. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 10) Benthic foraminifera in late Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-591. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810692
  3. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 11) Benthic foraminifera in Pliocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-591. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810693
  4. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 12) Benthic foraminifera in Eocene-Oligocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-592. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810694
  5. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 13) Benthic foraminifera in early-mid Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-592. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810695
  6. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 14) Benthic foraminifera in late Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-592. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810696
  7. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 15) Benthic foraminifera in Pliocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-592. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810697
  8. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 16) Benthic foraminifera in Eocene-Oligocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-593. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810698
  9. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 17) Benthic foraminifera in early Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-593. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810699
  10. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 18) Benthic foraminifera in late Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-593. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810700
  11. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 19) Benthic foraminifera in Pliocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-593. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810701
  12. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 2) Benthic foraminifera in Pliocene sediments of DSDP Hole 89-586B. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810683
  13. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 20) Benthic foraminifera in early Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-594. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810702
  14. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 21) Benthic foraminifera in middle Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-594. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810703
  15. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 22) Benthic foraminifera in Pliocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-594. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810704
  16. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 3) Benthic foraminifera in early-middle Miocene sediments of DSDP Site 89-586. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810684
  17. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 4) Benthic foraminifera in middle to late Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-588. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810685
  18. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 5) Benthic foraminifera in Pliocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-588. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810686
  19. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 6) Benthic foraminifera in early-middle Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-590B. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810688
  20. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 7) Benthic foraminifera in middle-late Miocene sediments of DSDP Site 90-590. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810689
  21. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 8) Benthic foraminifera in Pliocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-590A. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810690
  22. Boersma, A (1986): (Table 9) Benthic foraminifera in early-middle Miocene sediments of DSDP Hole 90-591B. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.810691