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Burton, Kevin W; Vance, Derek (2009): Neodymium isotope composition of planktonic foraminifera from ODP Hole 121-758A. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.711291, Supplement to: Burton, KW; Vance, D (2000): Glacial-interglacial variations in the neodymium isotope composition of seawater in the Bay of Bengal recorded by planktonic foraminifera. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 176(3-4), 425-441, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0012-821X(00)00011-X

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Abstract:
This study presents neodymium isotope and elemental data for cleaned planktonic foraminifera from ODP site 758 in the southernmost reaches of the Bay of Bengal in the north-east Indian Ocean. Cleaning experiments using oxidative-reductive techniques suggest that diagenetic Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide coatings can be effectively removed, and that the measured Nd isotope composition reflects the composition of seawater from which the foraminiferal calcium carbonate was precipitated. Modern core-top Pulleniatina obliquiloculata and Globorotalia menardii give epsilon-Nd values of 310.12 +/- 0.16 and 310.28 +/- 0.16, respectively, indistinguishable from recent direct measurements of surface seawater in this area. A high-resolution Nd isotope record obtained from G. menardii for the past 150 kyr shows systematic variations (Delta epsilon-Nd = 3) on glacial-interglacial timescales. The timing of those variations shows a remarkable correspondence with the global oxygen isotope record, which suggests a process controlling the Nd isotope composition that responds in phase with global climate cycles. Palaeoclimate reconstruction indicates that during the last glacial maximum changes in monsoon circulation resulted in a reduction in rainfall over the Indian subcontinent, and a decrease in the flux of river water delivered to the Bay of Bengal. Thus, changes in the riverine input of Nd, a change in either flux or composition, most likely caused the isotope variations, although changes in dust source or local ocean circulation may have also played a role. These results clearly establish a link between climate change and variations in radiogenic isotopes in the oceans, and illustrate the potential of Nd isotopes in foraminifera for highresolution palaeoceanographic reconstruction.
Project(s):
Coverage:
Latitude: 5.384200 * Longitude: 90.361200
Date/Time Start: 1988-06-15T23:50:00 * Date/Time End: 1988-06-24T13:30:00
Event(s):
121-758A * Latitude: 5.384200 * Longitude: 90.361200 * Date/Time Start: 1988-06-15T23:50:00 * Date/Time End: 1988-06-24T13:30:00 * Elevation: -2935.0 m * Penetration: 676.8 m * Recovery: 453.83 m * Location: Indian Ocean * Campaign: Leg121 * Basis: Joides Resolution * Device: Drilling/drill rig (DRILL) * Comment: 73 cores; 676.8 m cored; 0 m drilled; 67.1 % recovery
Size:
4 datasets

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