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Stapp, Laura; Thomsen, Jörn; Schade, Hanna; Bock, Christian; Melzner, Frank; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Lannig, Gisela (2018): Seawater carbonate chemistry and physiology of Baltic blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.890635, Supplement to: Stapp, L et al. (2017): Intra-population variability of ocean acidification impacts on the physiology of Baltic blue mussels (Mytilus edulis): integrating tissue and organism response. Journal of Comparative Physiology B-Biochemical Systemic and Environmentalphysiology, 187(4), 529-543, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00360-016-1053-6

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Abstract:
Increased maintenance costs at cellular, and consequently organism level, are thought to be involved in shaping the sensitivity of marine calcifiers to ocean acidification (OA). Yet, knowledge of the capacity of marine calcifiers to undergo metabolic adaptation is sparse. In Kiel Fjord, blue mussels thrive despite periodically high seawater PCO2, making this population interesting for studying metabolic adaptation under OA. Consequently, we conducted a multi-generation experiment and compared physiological responses of F1 mussels from 'tolerant' and 'sensitive' families exposed to OA for 1 year. Family classifications were based on larval survival; tolerant families settled at all PCO2 levels (700, 1120, 2400 µatm) while sensitive families did not settle at the highest PCO2 (>=99.8% mortality). We found similar filtration rates between family types at the control and intermediate PCO2 level. However, at 2400 µatm, filtration and metabolic scope of gill tissue decreased in tolerant families, indicating functional limitations at the tissue level. Routine metabolic rates (RMR) and summed tissue respiration (gill and outer mantle tissue) of tolerant families were increased at intermediate PCO2, indicating elevated cellular homeostatic costs in various tissues. By contrast, OA did not affect tissue and routine metabolism of sensitive families. However, tolerant mussels were characterised by lower RMR at control PCO2 than sensitive families, which had variable RMR. This might provide the energetic scope to cover increased energetic demands under OA, highlighting the importance of analysing intra-population variability. The mechanisms shaping such difference in RMR and scope, and thus species' adaptation potential, remain to be identified.
Further details:
Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Epitalon, Jean-Marie; Lavigne, Héloise; Orr, James C; Gentili, Bernard; Proye, Aurélien; Soetaert, Karline; Rae, James (2016): seacarb: seawater carbonate chemistry with R. R package version 3.1. https://cran.r-project.org/package=seacarb
Coverage:
Latitude: 54.330000 * Longitude: 10.150000
Date/Time Start: 2012-06-01T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2013-09-30T00:00:00
Event(s):
Kiel_fjord_OA * Latitude: 54.330000 * Longitude: 10.150000 * Date/Time Start: 2012-06-01T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2013-09-30T00:00:00 * Device: Experiment (EXP)
Comment:
In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2016) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation by seacarb is 2018-05-23.
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethodComment
1TypeTypeStapp, Laurastudy
2SpeciesSpeciesStapp, Laura
3Registration number of speciesReg spec noStapp, Laura
4Uniform resource locator/link to referenceURL refStapp, LauraWoRMS Aphia ID
5Experiment durationExp durationmonthsStapp, Laura
6TreatmentTreatStapp, Laura
7ClassificationClassificationStapp, LauraFamily
8IdentificationIDStapp, LauraSire
9IdentificationIDStapp, LauraDam
10IdentificationIDStapp, LauraAnimal
11RunRunStapp, Laura
12Clearance rateCRml/minStapp, Laura
13Correlation coefficient, isotope ratio errorRhoStapp, Lauradecrease of algae over time
14Clearance rateCRml/minStapp, Lauramean
15Shell lengthShell lmmStapp, Laura
16Clearance rate per shell lengthCR/slml/min/cmStapp, Laura
17Oxygen consumption, per massMO2 conµmol/g/hStapp, Laurawhole animal
18Oxygen consumption, per massMO2 conµmol/g/hStapp, Lauraouter mantle tissue
19Oxygen consumption, per massMO2 conµmol/g/hStapp, Lauragill tissue
20PercentagePerc%Stapp, Lauragill fraction
21PercentagePerc%Stapp, Lauraouter mantle fraction
22PercentagePerc%Stapp, Lauracombine
23Factorial metabolic scopeFMSStapp, Laura
24Net Metabolic scopeNMSµmol/g/hStapp, Laura
25PercentagePerc%Stapp, LauraProtein synthesis (% to outer mantle MO2)
26pH, extracellularpHeStapp, LauraNBS scalce
27SalinitySalStapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
28Salinity, standard errorSal std e±Stapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
29Temperature, waterTemp°CStapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
30Temperature, water, standard errorT std e±Stapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
31pHpHStapp, LauraNBS scalce, during June to September 2012
32pH, standard errorpH std e±Stapp, LauraNBS scalce, during June to September 2012
33pHpHStapp, Lauratotal scale, during June to September 2012
34pH, standard errorpH std e±Stapp, Lauratotal scale, during June to September 2012
35Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgStapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
36Alkalinity, total, standard errorAT std e±Stapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
37Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgStapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
38Carbon, inorganic, dissolved, standard errorDIC std e±Stapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
39Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmStapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
40Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air), standard errorpCO2water_SST_wet std e±Stapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
41Calcite saturation stateOmega CalStapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
42Calcite saturation state, standard errorOmega Cal std e±Stapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
43Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgStapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
44Aragonite saturation state, standard errorOmega Arg std e±Stapp, Lauraduring June to September 2012
45SalinitySalStapp, Lauramin, September 2012 to September 2013
46SalinitySalStapp, Lauramax, September 2012 to September 2013
47Temperature, waterTemp°CStapp, Lauramin, September 2012 to September 2013
48Temperature, waterTemp°CStapp, Lauramax, September 2012 to September 2013
49pHpHStapp, LauraNBS scalce, during September 2012 to September 2013
50pH, standard errorpH std e±Stapp, LauraNBS scalce, during September 2012 to September 2013
51pHpHStapp, Lauratotal scale, during September 2012 to September 2013
52pH, standard errorpH std e±Stapp, Lauratotal scale, during September 2012 to September 2013
53Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgStapp, Lauraduring September 2012 to September 2013
54Alkalinity, total, standard errorAT std e±Stapp, Lauraduring September 2012 to September 2013
55Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgStapp, Lauraduring September 2012 to September 2013
56Carbon, inorganic, dissolved, standard errorDIC std e±Stapp, Lauraduring September 2012 to September 2013
57Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmStapp, Lauraduring September 2012 to September 2013
58Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air), standard errorpCO2water_SST_wet std e±Stapp, Lauraduring September 2012 to September 2013
59Calcite saturation stateOmega CalStapp, Lauraduring September 2012 to September 2013
60Calcite saturation state, standard errorOmega Cal std e±Stapp, Lauraduring September 2012 to September 2013
61Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgStapp, Lauraduring September 2012 to September 2013
62Aragonite saturation state, standard errorOmega Arg std e±Stapp, Lauraduring September 2012 to September 2013
63Carbonate system computation flagCSC flagYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
64pHpHYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)total scale, during June to September 2012
65Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)during June to September 2012
66Fugacity of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)fCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)during June to September 2012
67Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)during June to September 2012
68Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)during June to September 2012
69Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)during June to September 2012
70Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)during June to September 2012
71Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)during June to September 2012
72Calcite saturation stateOmega CalYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)during June to September 2012
Size:
22879 data points

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