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Weber, Michael E; Lantzsch, Hendrik; Dekens, Petra S; Das, Supriyo K; Reilly, Brendan T; Martos, Yasmina M; Meyer-Jacob, Carsten; Agrahari, Sandip; Ekblad, Alf; Titschack, Jürgen; Holmes, Elisabeth; Wolfgramm, Philipp (2018): 200,000 years of monsoonal history recorded on the lower Bengal Fan , IODP Hole 354-U1452C. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889300, Supplement to: Weber, ME et al. (2018): 200,000 years of monsoonal history recorded on the lower Bengal Fan - strong response to insolation forcing. Global and Planetary Change, 166, 107-119, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2018.04.003

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Abstract:
We conducted a multidisciplinary study to provide the stratigraphic and palaeoclimatic context of monsoonal rainfall dynamics and their responses to orbital forcing for the Bay of Bengal. Using sediment lightness we established an age model at orbital resolution for International Ocean Discovery Programme (IODP) Core U1452C-1H that covers the last 200 ka in the lower Bengal Fan. The low-resolution δ18O of G. sacculifer is consistent with global δ18O records, at least for major glacial-to-interglacial transitions. The variability of total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and the δ13C composition of organic matter indicate the marine origin of organic matter. Marine primary productivity likely increased during insolation minima, indicative for an enhanced NE monsoon during glacials and stadials. Pristine insolation forcing is also documented for wet-bulk density, red-green color variability, and grain-size variations, indicating that darker and coarser-grained material deposited at higher sedimentation rates during insolation minima. Stronger NE monsoon likely amplified ocean-atmosphere interactions over the Indian Ocean, leading to stronger upwelling through shoaling the thermocline, and higher delivery of sediment to the Bay of Bengal due to higher soil erosion on land. In addition, lower glacial and stadial sea levels as well as stronger westward surface circulation favored delivery of coarser-grained fluvial material to the lower Bengal Fan. At the same time the stronger NE monsoon might have increased the aeolian supply. Total inorganic carbon, the Ca/Ti ratio, and biogenic silica vary dominantly on obliquity frequencies, suggesting mobilization and transport of lithogenic material primarily during lowered sea levels and/or higher influence of the Northern Hemisphere westerlies on the dust transport from the Tibetan Plateau. The close resemblance of sediment lightness and the climate record of Antarctic ice cores over multiple glacial cycles indicate close relationship between high southern latitude and tropical Asian climate through shifts in position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The Bengal Fan monsoonal record shows very clear and strict responses to insolation forcing in the lower part from ~200 ka to the Younger Toba Tuff during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 7 – 5, and less distinct response patterns after deposition of the ash during MIS 4 – 2, consistent with low-amplitude changes in insolation.
Coverage:
Latitude: 8.006810 * Longitude: 87.181860
Event(s):
354-U1452C * Latitude: 8.006810 * Longitude: 87.181860 * Elevation: -3671.5 m * Campaign: EXP354 (Bengal Fan) * Basis: Joides Resolution * Device: Core drilling (CDRILL)
Size:
12 datasets

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Datasets listed in this publication series

  1. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Age depth model of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889299
  2. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Biogenic opal and TIC of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889406
  3. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Ca/Ti ratios of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889405
  4. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Color reflectance L from RGB of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889400
  5. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Color reflectance L* and b* of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889399
  6. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Color reflectance spectra of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889398
  7. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Geochemistry of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889404
  8. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Grain size distribution of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889403
  9. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Magnetic susceptibility of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889401
  10. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Mean grain size of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889402
  11. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Stable oxygen isotopic record of Globigerinoides sacculifer of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889298
  12. Weber, ME; Lantzsch, H; Dekens, PS et al. (2018): Wet bulk density of IODP Hole 354-U1452C. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.889397