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Behrends, Marion (2003): Distribution of heavy minerals in sediment cores from the Laptev Sea continental margin and the central Arctic Ocean. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.866938, Supplement to: Behrends, M (1999): Rekonstruktion von Meereisdrift und terrigenem Sedimenteintrag im Spätquartär: Schwermineralassoziationen in Sedimenten des Laptev-See-Kontinentalrandes und des zentralen Arktischen Ozeans (Reconstruction of sea-ice drift and terrigenous sediment supply in the Late Quaternary: Heavy-mineral associations in sediments of the Laptev Sea continental margin and the central Arctic Ocean). Berichte zur Polarforschung = Reports on Polar Research, 310, 167 pp, https://doi.org/10.2312/BzP_0310_1999

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Abstract:
Focussing on heavy-mineral associations in the Laptev-Sea continental margin area and the eastern Arctic Ocean, 129 surface sediment samples, two short and four long gravity cores have been studied.
By means of the accessory components, heavy-mineral associations of surface sediment samples from the Laptev-See continental slope allowed the distinction into two different mineralogical provinces, each influenced by fluvial input of the Siberian river Systems. Transport pathways via sea ice from the shallow shelf areas into the Arctic Ocean up to the final ablation areas of the Fram Strait can be reconstructed by heavy-mineral data of surface sediments from the central Arctic Ocean. The shallow shelf of the Laptev Sea seems to be the most important source area for terrigenous material, as indicated by the abundant occurence of amphiboles and clinopyroxenes. Underneath the mixing Zone of the two dominating surface circulation Systems, the Beaufort- Gyre and Transpolar-Drift system, the imprint of the Amerasian shelf regions up to the Fram Strait is detectable because of a characteristical heavy-mineral association dominated by detrital carbonate and opaque minerals.
Based On heavy-mineral characteristics of the potential circum-Arctic source areas, sea-ice drift, origin and distribution of ice-rafted material can be reconstructed during the past climatic cycles. Different factors controlling the transport of terrigenous material into the Arctic Ocean. The entrainment of particulate matter is triggered by the sea level, which flooded during highs and lows different regions resulting in the incorporation of sediment from different source areas into the sea ice. Additionally, the fluvial input even at low stands of sea level is responsible for the delivery of material of distinct sources for entrainment into the sea ice.
Glacials and interglacials of climate cycles of the last 780 000 years left a characteristical signal in the central Arctic Ocean sediments caused by the ice- rafted material from different sources in the circum-Arctic regions and its change through time. Changes in the heavy-mineral association from an amphibole-dominated into a garnet-epidote-assemblage can be related to climate-related changes in source areas and directions of geostrophic winds, the dominating drive of the sea-ice drift.
During Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6, the central Arctic Ocean is marked by an heavy-mineral signal, which occurs in recent sediments of the eastern Kara Sea. Its characteristics are high amounts of epidote, garnet and apatite. On the other hand, during the Same time interval a continuous record of Laptev Sea sediments is documented with high contents of amphiboles on the Lomonosov Ridge near the Laptev Sea continental slope. A nearly similar Pattern was detected in MIS 5 and 4. Small-scale glaciations in the Putorana-mountains and the Anabar-shield may have caused changes in the drainage area of the rivers and therefore a change in fluvial input. During MIS 3, the heavy-mineral association of central Arctic sediments show similar patterns than the Holocene mineral assemblage which consists of amphiboles, ortho- and clinopyroxenes with a Laptev Sea source. These minerals are indicating a stable Transpolar-Drift system similar to recent conditions. An extended influence of the Beaufort Gyre is only recognized, when sediment material from the Amerasian shelf areas reached the core location PS2757-718 during Termination Ib.
Based On heavy-mineral data from Laptev-Sea continental slope Core PS2458-4 the paleo-sea-ice drift in the Laptev Sea during 14.000 years was reconstructed. During Holocene sea-level rise, the bathymetrically deeper parts of the Western shelf were flooded first. At the beginning of the Atlantic stage, nearly the entire shelf was marine influenced by fully marine conditions and the recent surface circulation was established.
Coverage:
Median Latitude: 82.855490 * Median Longitude: 137.377346 * South-bound Latitude: 68.820000 * West-bound Longitude: 58.320882 * North-bound Latitude: 88.780800 * East-bound Longitude: -167.000000
Date/Time Start: 1987-03-08T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 1995-09-11T00:00:00
Size:
15 datasets

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Datasets listed in this publication series

  1. Behrends, M (2003): Age model of sediment core PS2185-3. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112557
  2. Behrends, M (2003): Age model of sediment core PS2185-6. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112558
  3. Behrends, M (2003): Age model of sediment core PS2458-4. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112559
  4. Behrends, M (2003): Age model of sediment core PS2725-5. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112560
  5. Behrends, M (2003): Age model of sediment core PS2741-1. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112561
  6. Behrends, M (2003): Age model of sediment core PS2757-8. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.51952
  7. Behrends, M (2003): Composite depth of sediment core PS2185-3. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112556
  8. Behrends, M (2003): Composite depth of sediment core PS2185-6. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.51911
  9. Behrends, M (2003): Distribution of heavy minerals in sediment core PS2185-3. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112562
  10. Behrends, M (2003): Distribution of heavy minerals in sediment core PS2185-6. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112563
  11. Behrends, M (2003): Distribution of heavy minerals in sediment core PS2458-4. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112564
  12. Behrends, M (2003): Distribution of heavy minerals in sediment core PS2725-5. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112565
  13. Behrends, M (2003): Distribution of heavy minerals in sediment core PS2741-1. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112566
  14. Behrends, M (2003): Distribution of heavy minerals in sediment core PS2757-8. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.112567
  15. Behrends, M (2003): Distribution of heavy minerals in surface sediments. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.51909