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Korff, Lucia; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Frederichs, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer; Diekmann, Bernhard (2016): Age model, magnetic and geochemical data of sediment core SO202/1_39-3 and magnetic susceptibility data of other INOPEX cores. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862899, Supplement to: Korff, L et al. (2016): Cyclic magnetite dissolution in Pleistocene sediments of the abyssal northwest Pacific Ocean: Evidence for glacial oxygen depletion and carbon trapping. Paleoceanography, 31(5), 600-624, https://doi.org/10.1002/2015PA002882

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Abstract:
The carbonate-free abyss of the North Pacific defies most paleoceanographic proxy methods and hence remains a "blank spot" in ocean and climate history. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic, geochemical, and sedimentological methods were combined to date and analyze seven middle to late Pleistocene northwest Pacific sediment cores from water depths of 5100 to 5700 m. Besides largely coherent tephra layers, the most striking features of these records are nearly magnetite-free zones corresponding to glacial marine isotope stages (MISs) 22, 12, 10, 8, 6, and 2. Magnetite depletion is correlated with organic carbon and quartz content and anticorrelated with biogenic barite and opal content. Within interglacial sections and mid-Pleistocene transition glacial stages MIS 20, 18, 16, and 14, magnetite fractions of detrital, volcanic, and bacterial origin are all well preserved. Such alternating successions of magnetic iron mineral preservation and depletion are known from sapropel-marl cycles, which accumulated under periodically changing bottom water oxygen and redox conditions. In the open central northwest Pacific Ocean, the only conceivable mechanism to cause such abrupt change is a modified glacial bottom water circulation. During all major glaciations since MIS 12, oxygen-depleted Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW)-sourced bottom water seems to have crept into the abyssal northwest Pacific below ~5000 m depth, thereby changing redox conditions in the sediment, trapping and preserving dissolved and particulate organic matter and, in consequence, reducing and dissolving both, biogenic and detrital magnetite. At deglaciation, a downward progressing oxidation front apparently remineralized and released these sedimentary carbon reservoirs without replenishing the magnetite losses.
Coverage:
Median Latitude: 38.623345 * Median Longitude: 160.563555 * South-bound Latitude: 38.011700 * West-bound Longitude: 149.484800 * North-bound Latitude: 40.291700 * East-bound Longitude: 169.280800
Date/Time Start: 2009-08-16T14:36:00 * Date/Time End: 2009-08-23T05:23:00
Size:
11 datasets

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Datasets listed in this publication series

  1. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Mineralogical composition of sediment core SO202/1_39-3. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862897
  2. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic of sediment core SO202/1_39-3. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862883
  3. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Sulfate concentrations of sediment core SO202/1_39-3. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862896
  4. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Total organic carbon and biogenic opal of sediment core SO202/1_39-3. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862889
  5. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Volume susceptibility of sediment core SO202/1_38-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862806
  6. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Volume susceptibility of sediment core SO202/1_39-3. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862807
  7. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Volume susceptibility of sediment core SO202/1_41-1. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862808
  8. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Volume susceptibility of sediment core SO202/1_42-1. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862809
  9. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Volume susceptibility of sediment core SO202/1_43-1. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862810
  10. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Volume susceptibility of sediment core SO202/1_44-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862811
  11. Korff, L; von Dobeneck, T; Frederichs, T et al. (2016): Volume susceptibility of sediment core SO202/1_45-1. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.862812