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Dupont, Sam; Mercurio, Matteo; Giacoletti, Antonio; Rinaldi, Alessandro; Mirto, Simone; D'Aquisto, Leonardo; Sabatino, Maria Antonietta; Sarà, Gianluca (2016): Functional consequences of prey acclimation to ocean acidification for the prey and its predator. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.860509, Supplement to: Dupont, S et al. (2015): Functional consequences of prey acclimation to ocean acidification for the prey and its predator. PeerJ PrePrints, https://doi.org/10.7287/peerj.preprints.1438v1

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Abstract:
Ocean acidification is the suite of chemical changes to the carbonate system of seawater as a consequence of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Despite a growing body of evidences demonstrating the negative effects of ocean acidification on marine species, the consequences at the ecosystem level are still unclear. One factor limiting our ability to upscale from species to ecosystem is the poor mechanistic understanding of the functional consequences of the observed effects on organisms. This is particularly true in the context of species interactions. The aim of this work was to investigate the functional consequence of the exposure of a prey (the mussel Brachidontes pharaonis) to ocean acidification for both the prey and its predator (the crab Eriphia verrucosa). Mussels exposed to pH 7.5 for >4 weeks showed significant decreases in condition index and in mechanical properties (65% decrease in maximum breaking load) as compared with mussels acclimated to pH 8.0. This translated into negative consequences for the mussel in presence of the predator crab. The crab feeding efficiency increased through a significant 27% decrease in prey handling time when offered mussels acclimated to the lowest pH. The predator was also negatively impacted by the acclimation of the prey, probably as a consequence of a decreased food quality. When fed with prey acclimated under decreased pH for 3 months, crab assimilation efficiency significantly decreased by 30% and its growth rate was 5 times slower as compared with crab fed with mussels acclimated under high pH. Our results highlight the important to consider physiological endpoints in the context of species interactions.
Further details:
Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Epitalon, Jean-Marie; Lavigne, Héloise (2015): seacarb: seawater carbonate chemistry with R. R package version 3.0.8. https://cran.r-project.org/package=seacarb
Coverage:
Latitude: 38.198130 * Longitude: 13.243010
Date/Time Start: 2012-06-01T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2013-06-30T00:00:00
Event(s):
Capo_Gallo * Latitude: 38.198130 * Longitude: 13.243010 * Date/Time Start: 2012-06-01T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2013-06-30T00:00:00 * Device: Experiment (EXP)
Comment:
In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2015) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation is 2016-05-16.
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethodComment
1TypeTypeDupont, Samstudy
2SpeciesSpeciesDupont, Sam
3Registration number of speciesReg spec noDupont, Sam
4Uniform resource locator/link to referenceURL refDupont, SamWoRMS Aphia ID
5FigureFigDupont, Sam
6Incubation durationInc durweeksDupont, Sam
7TreatmentTreatDupont, Sam
8LengthlmmDupont, Sam
9Condition indexCIDupont, Sam
10Breaking loadBreaking loadNDupont, Sam
11Time in secondsTimesDupont, Samsearching
12Time in secondsTimesDupont, Samhandling
13Assimilation efficiencyAssimilation effDupont, Sam
14Growth rateµmg/dayDupont, Sam
15SalinitySalDupont, Sam
16pHpHDupont, SamNBS scale
17pH, standard errorpH std e±Dupont, SamNBS scale
18Temperature, waterTemp°CDupont, Sam
19Temperature, water, standard errorT std e±Dupont, Sam
20Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmDupont, SamCalculated using CO2SYS
21Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air), standard errorpCO2water_SST_wet std e±Dupont, SamCalculated using CO2SYS
22Calcite saturation stateOmega CalDupont, SamCalculated using CO2SYS
23Calcite saturation state, standard errorOmega Cal std e±Dupont, SamCalculated using CO2SYS
24Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgDupont, SamCalculated using CO2SYS
25Aragonite saturation state, standard errorOmega Arg std e±Dupont, SamCalculated using CO2SYS
26Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgDupont, Sam
27Carbonate system computation flagCSC flagYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
28pHpHYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)total scale
29Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
30Fugacity of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)fCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
31Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
32Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
33Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
34Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
35Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
36Calcite saturation stateOmega CalYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
Size:
24638 data points

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