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Werner, Franziska Julie; Graiff, Angelika; Matthiessen, Birte (2016): Seaweed - epiphyte - mesograzer communities were tested for their responses to elevated seawater temperature and [CO2] in benthic mesocosms experiments across four consecutive seasons of one year in Kiel, Germany. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.853952, Supplement to: Werner, FJ et al. (2016): Temperature effects on seaweed-sustaining top-down control vary with season. Oecologia, 180(3), 889-901, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-015-3489-x

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Abstract:
Rising seawater temperature and CO2 concentrations (ocean acidification) represent two of the most influential factors impacting marine ecosystems in the face of global climate change. In ecological climate change research full-factorial experiments across seasons in multi-species, cross-trophic level set-ups are essential as they allow making realistic estimations about direct and indirect effects and the relative importance of both major environmental stressors on ecosystems. In benthic mesocosm experiments we tested the responses of coastal Baltic Sea Fucus vesiculosus communities to elevated seawater temperature and CO2 concentrations across four seasons of one year. While increasing [CO2] levels only had minor effects, warming had strong and persistent effects on grazers which affected the Fucus community differently depending on season. In late summer a temperature-driven collapse of grazers caused a cascading effect from the consumers to the foundation species resulting in overgrowth of Fucus thalli by epiphytes. In fall/ winter, outside the growing season of epiphytes, intensified grazing under warming resulted in a significant reduction of Fucus biomass. Thus, we confirm the prediction that future increasing water temperatures influence marine food-web processes by altering top-down control, but we also show that specific consequences for food-web structure depend on season. Since Fucus vesiculosus is the dominant habitat-forming brown algal system in the Baltic Sea, its potential decline under global warming implicates the loss of key functions and services such as provision of nutrient storage, substrate, food, shelter and nursery grounds for a diverse community of marine invertebrates and fish in Baltic Sea coastal waters.
Related to:
Wahl, Martin; Buchholz, Björn (2015): Kiel Outdoor Benthocosms: Benthocosm A1 in Kiel Fjord from April 2013 to September 2014. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.842719
Coverage:
Latitude: 54.330000 * Longitude: 10.150000
Date/Time Start: 2013-06-19T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2014-04-12T00:00:00
Event(s):
Benthocosm_A1 (Kiel Fjord) * Latitude: 54.330000 * Longitude: 10.150000 * Device: Mesocosm experiment (MESO)
Benthocosm_A2 (Kiel Fjord) * Latitude: 54.330000 * Longitude: 10.150000 * Device: Mesocosm experiment (MESO)
Benthocosm_B1 (Kiel Fjord) * Latitude: 54.330000 * Longitude: 10.150000 * Device: Mesocosm experiment (MESO)
Comment:
Kiel Outdoor BenthocosmsTreatments:Temperature Delta+5°C as compared to the ambient Kiel Fjord seawater temperature, including its natural fluctuationCO2 Delta+600 ppm
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethodComment
1Event labelEventWerner, Franziska Julie
2LocationLocationWerner, Franziska Julie
3ExperimentExpWerner, Franziska Julie
4SeasonSeasonWerner, Franziska Julie
5DATE/TIMEDate/TimeWerner, Franziska JulieGeocode
6Sample code/labelSample labelWerner, Franziska Julie
7TreatmentTreatWerner, Franziska JuliepCO2
8TreatmentTreatWerner, Franziska JulieTemperature
9Carbon dioxide, partial pressurepCO2ppmvWerner, Franziska Julie
10Microepiphytes, biomass as carbonMicroepiphytes Cµg/gWerner, Franziska Julieµg C / 1 g dry weight Fucus
11Biomass, dry massBiom dmgWerner, Franziska Julietotal biomass Macroepiphytes
12Number of individualsInd No#Werner, Franziska JulieAbundance Mezograzers, total number of individuals of the three most important mesograzer species per tank
13Biomass, ash free dry massBiom AFDMgWerner, Franziska JulieTotal Biomass Mesograzers
14IdoteaIdotea#Werner, Franziska Julie
15GammarusGammarus#Werner, Franziska Julie
16Littorina littoreaL. littorea#Werner, Franziska Julie
17Biomass, ash free dry massBiom AFDMgWerner, Franziska JulieIdotea spp.
18Biomass, ash free dry massBiom AFDMgWerner, Franziska JulieGammarus spp.
19Biomass, ash free dry massBiom AFDMgWerner, Franziska JulieL. littorea
20Biomass, wet massBiom wmgWerner, Franziska JulieFucus
21Biomass, ash free dry mass per individualBIOM AFDMmg/#Werner, Franziska JulieIdotea
22Biomass, ash free dry mass per individualBIOM AFDMmg/#Werner, Franziska JulieGammarus
23Biomass, ash free dry mass per individualBIOM AFDMmg/#Werner, Franziska JulieLittorina
Size:
1008 data points

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