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Taucher, Jan; Jones, J; James, A; Brzezinski, Mark A; Carlson, C A; Riebesell, Ulf; Passow, Uta (2015): Combined effects of CO2 and temperature on carbon uptake and partitioning by the marine diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Dactyliosolen fragilissimus. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.849402, Supplement to: Taucher, J et al. (2015): Combined effects of CO2 and temperature on carbon uptake and partitioning by the marine diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Dactyliosolen fragilissimus. Limnology and Oceanography, 60(3), 901-919, https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.10063

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Abstract:
Carbon uptake and partitioning of two globally abundant diatom species, Thalassiosira weissflogii and Dactyliosolen fragilissimus, was investigated in batch culture experiments under four conditions: ambient (15°C, 400 µatm), high CO2 (15°C, 1000 µatm), high temperature (20°C, 400 µatm), and combined (20°C, 1000 µatm). The experiments were run from exponential growth into the stationary phase (six days after nitrogen depletion), allowing us to track biogeochemical dynamics analogous to bloom situations in the ocean. Elevated CO2 had a fertilizing effect and enhanced uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) by about 8% for T. weissflogii and by up to 39% for D. fragilissimus. This was also reflected in higher cell numbers, build-up of particulate and dissolved organic matter, and transparent exopolymer particles. The CO2 effects were most prominent in the stationary phase when nitrogen was depleted and CO2(aq) concentrations were low. This indicates that diatoms in the high CO2 treatments could take up more DIC until CO2 concentrations in seawater became so low that carbon limitation occurs. These results suggest that, contrary to common assumptions, diatoms could be highly sensitive to ongoing changes in oceanic carbonate chemistry, particularly under nutrient limitation. Warming from 15 to 20 °C had a stimulating effect on one species but acted as a stressor on the other species, highlighting the importance of species-specific physiological optima and temperature ranges in the response to ocean warming. Overall, these sensitivities to CO2 and temperature could have profound impacts on diatoms blooms and the biological pump.
Keyword(s):
Biomass/Abundance/Elemental composition; Bottles or small containers/Aquaria ( 20 L); Chromista; Dactyliosolen fragilissimus; Laboratory experiment; Laboratory strains; Not applicable; Ochrophyta; Other metabolic rates; Pelagos; Phytoplankton; Single species; Temperature; Thalassiosira weissflogii
Related to:
Passow, Uta (2013): Dataset: Data Set 1A: Partitioning of carbon as a function of pCO2 and temperature during growth of Thalassiosira weissflogii. Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office, http://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/4046
Passow, Uta (2013): Dataset: Data Set 2A: Partitioning of carbon as a function of pCO2 and temperature during growth of Dactyliosolen fragilissimus. Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office, http://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/4047
Further details:
Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Epitalon, Jean-Marie; Lavigne, Héloise (2015): seacarb: seawater carbonate chemistry with R. R package version 3.0.8. https://cran.r-project.org/package=seacarb
Comment:
In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2015) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation is 2015-09-15.
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethodComment
1SpeciesSpeciesPassow, Uta
2Temperature, waterTemp°CPassow, Uta
3Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmPassow, Utatreatment
4ReplicateReplicatePassow, Uta
5Duration, number of daysDurationdaysPassow, Uta
6pHpHPassow, UtaSpectrophotometrictotal scale at 25 °C
7Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/lPassow, Uta
8FluorescenceFluorescencePassow, UtaInstantaneous Chlorophyll Fluorescence (FT from AquaPen)
9Nitrate[NO3]-µmol/lPassow, Uta
10Phosphate[PO4]3-µmol/lPassow, Uta
11SilicateSi(OH)4µmol/lPassow, Uta
12Carbon, organic, particulatePOCµmol/lPassow, Uta
13Nitrogen, organic, particulatePONµmol/lPassow, Uta
14Carbon, organic, dissolvedDOCµmol/lPassow, Uta
15Nitrogen, organic, dissolvedDONµmol/lPassow, Uta
16Transparent exopolymer particles as Gum Xanthan equivalents per volumeTEPµg Xeq/lPassow, Uta
17Bacterial productionBPpmol/l/hPassow, Utapmol leucine/L/h
18SalinitySalPassow, Uta
19Carbonate system computation flagCSC flagYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
20pHpHYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)total scale in situ
21Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
22Fugacity of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)fCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
23Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
24Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
25Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
26Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
27Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
28Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
29Calcite saturation stateOmega CalYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
Size:
4976 data points

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