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Schalkhausser, Burgel; Bock, Christian; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Lannig, Gisela (2014): Escape performance of temperate king scallop, Pecten maximus under ocean warming and acidification. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.843533, Supplement to: Schalkhausser, B et al. (2014): Escape performance of temperate king scallop, Pecten maximus under ocean warming and acidification. Marine Biology, 161(12), 2819-2829, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-014-2548-x

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Abstract:
Among bivalves, scallops are exceptional due to their capacity to escape from predators by swimming which is provided by rapid and strong claps that are produced by the phasic muscle interspersed with tonic muscle contractions. Based on the concept of oxygen and capacity-limited thermal tolerance, the following hypothesis was tested: ocean warming and acidification (OWA) would induce disturbances in aerobic metabolic scope and extracellular acid-case status and impair swimming performance in temperate scallops. Following long-term incubation under near-future OWA scenarios [20 vs. 10 °C (control) and 0.112 kPa CO2 (hypercapnia) vs. 0.040 kPa CO2 (normocapnic control)], the clapping performance and metabolic rates (MR) were measured in resting (RMR) and fatigued (maximum MR) king scallops, Pecten maximus, from Roscoff, France. Exposure to OA, either alone or combined with warming, left MR and swimming parameters such as the total number of claps and clapping forces virtually unchanged. Only the duration of the escape response was affected by OA which caused earlier exhaustion in hyper- than in normocapnic scallops at 10 °C. While maximum MR was unaffected, warm exposure increased RMR in both normocapnic and hypercapnic P. maximus resulting in similar Q 10 values of ~2.2. The increased costs of maintenance and the observation of strongly reduced haemolymph PO2 levels indicate that at 20 °C scallops have reached the upper thermal pejus range with unbalanced capacities for aerobic energy metabolism. As a consequence, warming to 20 °C decreased mean phasic force during escape performance until fatigue. The observed prolonged recovery time in warm incubated scallops might be a consequence of elevated metabolic costs at reduced oxygen availability in the warmth.
Keyword(s):
Acid-base regulation; Animalia; Behaviour; Benthic animals; Benthos; Bottles or small containers/Aquaria (<20 L); Coast and continental shelf; Growth/Morphology; Laboratory experiment; Mollusca; North Atlantic; Pecten maximus; Respiration; Single species; Temperate; Temperature
Further details:
Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Epitalon, Jean-Marie; Lavigne, Héloise (2015): seacarb: seawater carbonate chemistry with R. R package version 3.0.6. https://cran.r-project.org/package=seacarb
Coverage:
Latitude: 48.709330 * Longitude: -3.933140
Date/Time Start: 2010-10-01T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2011-11-30T00:00:00
Event(s):
Roscoff_OA * Latitude: 48.709330 * Longitude: -3.933140 * Date/Time Start: 2010-10-01T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 2011-11-30T00:00:00 * Method/Device: Experiment (EXP) * Comment: Time period of experiments: October/November 2010 and 2011, respectively
Comment:
In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2015) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI).
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethod/DeviceComment
1SpeciesSpeciesSchalkhausser, Burgel
2ExperimentExpSchalkhausser, Burgel
3TreatmentTreatSchalkhausser, Burgel
4Temperature, waterTemp°CSchalkhausser, Burgeltreatment
5IdentificationIDSchalkhausser, Burgelanimal
6LengthlmmSchalkhausser, Burgel
7HeighthmmSchalkhausser, Burgel
8WidthwmmSchalkhausser, Burgel
9Dry massDry mgSchalkhausser, Burgel
10Condition indexCISchalkhausser, Burgel
11Muscle condition indexMCISchalkhausser, Burgel
12Haemolymph, partial pressure of oxygenpO2 (ha)kPaSchalkhausser, Burgel
13Haemolymph, partial pressure of carbon dioxidepCO2 (ha)kPaSchalkhausser, Burgel
14Haemolymph, pHpH (ha)Schalkhausser, Burgel
15Haemolymph, total carbon dioxideTCO2 (ha)mmol/lSchalkhausser, Burgel
16Haemolymph, bicarbonate ion[HCO3]- (ha)mmol/lSchalkhausser, Burgel
17Number of clapsClaps#Schalkhausser, Burgel
18ForceFNSchalkhausser, Burgeltotal
19ForceFNSchalkhausser, Burgelmean phasic
20ForceFNSchalkhausser, Burgeltonic
21Time in minutesTimeminSchalkhausser, Burgeltime to fatigue
22Time in hoursTimehSchalkhausser, Burgeltime to recover
23Oxygen, metabolic rateMet rate O2µmol/h/gSchalkhausser, Burgelresting
24Oxygen, metabolic rateMet rate O2µmol/h/gSchalkhausser, Burgelmaximum
25Net aerobic scopeNASµmol/h/gSchalkhausser, Burgel
26Factorial aerobic scopeFactorial aerobic scopeSchalkhausser, Burgel
27Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetPaSchalkhausser, BurgelCalculated using CO2SYS
28Partial pressure of carbon dioxide, standard deviationpCO2 std dev±Schalkhausser, BurgelCalculated using CO2SYS
29Temperature, waterTemp°CSchalkhausser, Burgel
30Temperature, water, standard deviationTemp std dev±Schalkhausser, Burgel
31pHpHSchalkhausser, BurgelPotentiometricNBS scale
32pH, standard deviationpH std dev±Schalkhausser, BurgelPotentiometricNBS scale
33pHpHSchalkhausser, BurgelCalculatedtotal scale
34pH, standard deviationpH std dev±Schalkhausser, BurgelCalculatedtotal scale
35SalinitySalSchalkhausser, Burgel
36Salinity, standard deviationSal std dev±Schalkhausser, Burgel
37Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICmmol/lSchalkhausser, BurgelCoulometric titration
38Carbon, inorganic, dissolved, standard deviationDIC std dev±Schalkhausser, BurgelCoulometric titration
39Carbonate system computation flagCSC flagYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
40Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
41Fugacity of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)fCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
42Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
43Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
44Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
45Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
46Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
47Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
48Calcite saturation stateOmega CalYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
Size:
3046 data points

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