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Hofmann, Laurie C; Heiden, Jasmin; Bischof, Kai; Teichberg, Mirta (2014): Nutrient availability affects the response of the calcifying chlorophyte Halimeda opuntia (L.) J.V. Lamouroux to low pH. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.839344, Supplement to: Hofmann, LC et al. (2013): Nutrient availability affects the response of the calcifying chlorophyte Halimeda opuntia (L.) J.V. Lamouroux to low pH. Planta, 239(1), 231-242, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00425-013-1982-1

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Abstract:
Atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions cause a decrease in the pH and aragonite saturation state of surface ocean water. As a result, calcifying organisms are expected to suffer under future ocean conditions, but their physiological responses may depend on their nutrient status. Because many coral reefs experience high inorganic nutrient loads or seasonal changes in nutrient availability, reef organisms in localized areas will have to cope with elevated carbon dioxide and changes in inorganic nutrients. Halimeda opuntia is a dominant calcifying primary producer on coral reefs that contributes to coral reef accretion. Therefore, we investigated the carbon and nutrient balance of H. opuntia exposed to elevated carbon dioxide and inorganic nutrients. We measured tissue nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon content as well as the activity of enzymes involved in inorganic carbon uptake and nitrogen assimilation (external carbonic anhydrase and nitrate reductase, respectively). Inorganic carbon content was lower in algae exposed to high CO2, but calcification rates were not significantly affected by CO2 or inorganic nutrients. Organic carbon was positively correlated to external carbonic anhydrase activity, while inorganic carbon showed the opposite correlation. Carbon dioxide had a significant effect on tissue nitrogen and organic carbon content, while inorganic nutrients affected tissue phosphorus and N:P ratios. Nitrate reductase activity was highest in algae grown under elevated CO2 and inorganic nutrient conditions and lowest when phosphate was limiting. In general, we found that enzymatic responses were strongly influenced by nutrient availability, indicating its important role in dictating the local responses of the calcifying primary producer H. opuntia to ocean acidification.
Keyword(s):
Benthos; Biomass/Abundance/Elemental composition; Calcification/Dissolution; Chlorophyta; Coast and continental shelf; Growth/Morphology; Halimeda opuntia; Laboratory experiment; Macroalgae; Macro-nutrients; Mesococosm or benthocosm; Not applicable; Other metabolic rates; Plantae; Primary production/Photosynthesis; Single species; Tropical
Further details:
Lavigne, Héloise; Epitalon, Jean-Marie; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre (2014): seacarb: seawater carbonate chemistry with R. R package version 3.0. https://cran.r-project.org/package=seacarb
Comment:
In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Lavigne et al, 2014) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation is 2014-11-24.
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethodComment
1SpeciesSpeciesHofmann, Laurie C
2TreatmentTreatHofmann, Laurie C
3Calcification rate of calcium carbonateCalc rate CaCO3µmol/g/hHofmann, Laurie C
4Carbonic anhydrase, activityCA activity1/gHofmann, Laurie C
5Nitrate reductase activityNO3 reduct actµmol/g/hHofmann, Laurie C
6Carbon, organic, totalTOC%Hofmann, Laurie C
7Carbon, inorganic, totalTIC%Hofmann, Laurie C
8Maximal electron transport rate, relativerETR maxµmol e/m2/sHofmann, Laurie C
9Carbon organic/inorganic ratioCO/CIHofmann, Laurie C
10Calcium carbonateCaCO3%Hofmann, Laurie C
11Nitrogen, totalTN%Hofmann, Laurie Ccontent of issue
12PhosphorusP%Hofmann, Laurie Ccontent of issue
13Nitrogen/Phosphorus ratioN/PHofmann, Laurie C
14Growth rateµ%/dayHofmann, Laurie C
15Light saturation pointIkµmol/m2/sHofmann, Laurie C
16Initial slope of rapid light curvealphaµmol electrons/µmol quantaHofmann, Laurie C
17SalinitySalHofmann, Laurie C
18Temperature, waterTemp°CHofmann, Laurie C
19pHpHHofmann, Laurie CPotentiometricNBS scale
20Alkalinity, totalATmmol(eq)/lHofmann, Laurie CPotentiometric titration
21Carbonate system computation flagCSC flagYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
22pHpHYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)total scale
23Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
24Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
25Fugacity of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)fCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
26Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
27Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
28Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
29Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
30Calcite saturation stateOmega CalYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
Size:
466 data points

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