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Appelhans, Yasmin S; Thomsen, Jörn; Opitz, Stephan; Pansch, Christian; Melzner, Frank; Wahl, Martin (2014): Juvenile sea stars exposed to acidification decrease feeding and growth with no acclimation potential. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.836847, Supplement to: Appelhans, YS et al. (2014): Juvenile sea stars exposed to acidification decrease feeding and growth with no acclimation potential. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 509, 227-239, https://doi.org/10.3354/meps10884

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Abstract:
Precise measurements were conducted in continuous flow seawater mesocosms located in full sunlight that compared metabolic response of coral, coral-macroalgae and macroalgae systems over a diurnal cycle. Irradiance controlled net photosynthesis (Pnet), which in turn drove net calcification (Gnet), and altered pH. Pnet exerted the dominant control on [CO3]2- and aragonite saturation state (Omega arag) over the diel cycle. Dark calcification rate decreased after sunset, reaching zero near midnight followed by an increasing rate that peaked at 03:00 h. Changes in Omega arag and pH lagged behind Gnet throughout the daily cycle by two or more hours. The flux rate Pnet was the primary driver of calcification. Daytime coral metabolism rapidly removes dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from the bulk seawater and photosynthesis provides the energy that drives Gnet while increasing the bulk water pH. These relationships result in a correlation between Gnet and Omega arag, with Omega arag as the dependent variable. High rates of H+ efflux continued for several hours following mid-day peak Gnet suggesting that corals have difficulty in shedding waste protons as described by the Proton Flux Hypothesis. DIC flux (uptake) followed Pnet and Gnet and dropped off rapidly following peak Pnet and peak Gnet indicating that corals can cope more effectively with the problem of limited DIC supply compared to the problem of eliminating H+. Over a 24 h period the plot of total alkalinity (AT) versus DIC as well as the plot of Gnet versus Omega arag revealed a circular hysteresis pattern over the diel cycle in the coral and coral-algae mesocosms, but not the macroalgae mesocosm. Presence of macroalgae did not change Gnet of the corals, but altered the relationship between Omega arag and Gnet. Predictive models of how future global changes will effect coral growth that are based on oceanic Omega arag must include the influence of future localized Pnet on Gnet and changes in rate of reef carbonate dissolution. The correlation between Omega arag and Gnet over the diel cycle is simply the response of the CO2-carbonate system to increased pH as photosynthesis shifts the equilibria and increases the [CO3]2- relative to the other DIC components of [HCO3]- and [CO2]. Therefore Omega arag closely tracked pH as an effect of changes in Pnet, which also drove changes in Gnet. Measurements of DIC flux and H+ flux are far more useful than concentrations in describing coral metabolism dynamics. Coral reefs are systems that exist in constant disequilibrium with the water column.
Keyword(s):
Animalia; Asterias rubens; Baltic Sea; Behaviour; Benthic animals; Benthos; Bottles or small containers/Aquaria ( 20 L); Coast and continental shelf; Echinodermata; Growth/Morphology; Laboratory experiment; Single species; Temperate
Further details:
Lavigne, Héloise; Epitalon, Jean-Marie; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre (2014): seacarb: seawater carbonate chemistry with R. R package version 3.0. https://cran.r-project.org/package=seacarb
Comment:
In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Lavigne et al, 2014) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation is 2014-11-19.
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethodComment
1SpeciesSpeciesAppelhans, Yasmin S
2FigureFigAppelhans, Yasmin S
3ExperimentExpAppelhans, Yasmin S
4Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmAppelhans, Yasmin Streatment
5Incubation durationInc durweeksAppelhans, Yasmin S
6MassMassgAppelhans, Yasmin Sfresh
7Confidence intervalCIAppelhans, Yasmin S95%, fresh mass
8Food consumptionFood conmg/dayAppelhans, Yasmin SMytilus edulis
9Confidence intervalCIAppelhans, Yasmin S95%, food consumption
10SizeSizemmAppelhans, Yasmin S
11IndividualsInd#Appelhans, Yasmin Sconsumed mussels
12Confidence intervalCIAppelhans, Yasmin S95%, number of consumed mussels
13Food consumptionFood conmg/weekAppelhans, Yasmin SMytilus edulis
14Confidence intervalCIAppelhans, Yasmin S95%, food consumption
15Scope for growthSfGJAppelhans, Yasmin S
16Confidence intervalCIAppelhans, Yasmin S95%, scope for growth
17Energy, work, quantity of heatEnergyJAppelhans, Yasmin Sequivalent to sea star growth
18Energy, work, quantity of heatEnergyJAppelhans, Yasmin Sequivalent of consumed mussels
19Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgAppelhans, Yasmin SCoulometric titration
20Carbon, inorganic, dissolved, standard deviationDIC std dev±Appelhans, Yasmin SCoulometric titration
21pHpHAppelhans, Yasmin SPotentiometrictotal scale
22pH, standard deviationpH std dev±Appelhans, Yasmin SPotentiometrictotal scale
23Temperature, waterTemp°CAppelhans, Yasmin S
24Temperature, water, standard deviationTemp std dev±Appelhans, Yasmin S
25SalinitySalAppelhans, Yasmin S
26Salinity, standard deviationSal std dev±Appelhans, Yasmin S
27Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmAppelhans, Yasmin SCalculated using CO2SYS
28Partial pressure of carbon dioxide, standard deviationpCO2 std dev±Appelhans, Yasmin SCalculated using CO2SYS
29Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgAppelhans, Yasmin SCalculated using CO2SYS
30Alkalinity, total, standard deviationAT std dev±Appelhans, Yasmin SCalculated using CO2SYS
31Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgAppelhans, Yasmin SCalculated using CO2SYS
32Aragonite saturation state, standard deviationOmega Arg std dev±Appelhans, Yasmin SCalculated using CO2SYS
33Calcite saturation stateOmega CalAppelhans, Yasmin SCalculated using CO2SYS
34Calcite saturation state, standard deviationOmega Cal std dev±Appelhans, Yasmin SCalculated using CO2SYS
35Carbonate system computation flagCSC flagYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
36Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
37Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
38Fugacity of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)fCO2water_SST_wetµatmYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
39Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
40Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
41Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
42Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
43Calcite saturation stateOmega CalYang, YanCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
Size:
4353 data points

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