Not logged in
PANGAEA.
Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

Barcelos e Ramos, Joana; Schulz, Kai Georg; Brownlee, Colin; Sett, Scarlett; Azevedo, Eduardo Brito (2014): Effects of increasing seawater carbon dioxide concentrations on chain formation of the diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.836367, Supplement to: Barcelos e Ramos, J et al. (2014): Effects of Increasing Seawater Carbon Dioxide Concentrations on Chain Formation of the Diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis. PLoS ONE, 9(3), e90749, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090749

Always quote above citation when using data! You can download the citation in several formats below.

RIS CitationBibTeX Citation

Abstract:
Diatoms can occur as single cells or as chain-forming aggregates. These two strategies affect buoyancy, predator evasion, light absorption and nutrient uptake. Adjacent cells in chains establish connections through various processes that determine strength and flexibility of the bonds, and at distinct cellular locations defining colony structure. Chain length has been found to vary with temperature and nutrient availability as well as being positively correlated with growth rate. However, the potential effect of enhanced carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and consequent changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on chain formation is virtually unknown. Here we report on experiments with semi-continuous cultures of the freshly isolated diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis grown under increasing CO2 levels ranging from 320 to 3400 µatm. We show that the number of cells comprising a chain, and therefore chain length, increases with rising CO2 concentrations. We also demonstrate that while cell division rate changes with CO2 concentrations, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cellular quotas vary proportionally, evident by unchanged organic matter ratios. Finally, beyond the optimum CO2 concentration for growth, carbon allocation changes from cellular storage to increased exudation of dissolved organic carbon. The observed structural adjustment in colony size could enable growth at high CO2 levels, since longer, spiral-shaped chains are likely to create microclimates with higher pH during the light period. Moreover increased chain length of Asterionellopsis glacialis may influence buoyancy and, consequently, affect competitive fitness as well as sinking rates. This would potentially impact the delicate balance between the microbial loop and export of organic matter, with consequences for atmospheric carbon dioxide.
Keyword(s):
Asterionellopsis glacialis; Biomass/Abundance/Elemental composition; Bottles or small containers/Aquaria ( 20 L); Chromista; Growth/Morphology; Laboratory experiment; North Atlantic; Ochrophyta; Open ocean; Other metabolic rates; Pelagos; Phytoplankton; Single species; Temperate
Further details:
Lavigne, Héloise; Epitalon, Jean-Marie; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre (2014): seacarb: seawater carbonate chemistry with R. R package version 3.0. https://cran.r-project.org/package=seacarb
Comment:
In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Lavigne et al, 2014) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation is 2014-09-30.
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethodComment
1SpeciesSpeciesBarcelos e Ramos, Joana
2Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmBarcelos e Ramos, Joana
3PercentagePerc%Barcelos e Ramos, Joanarelative number of cells per chain, 1 to 6 cells in one chain
4PercentagePerc%Barcelos e Ramos, Joanarelative number of cells per chain, 7 to 12 cells in one chain
5PercentagePerc%Barcelos e Ramos, Joanarelative number of cells per chain, 13 to 18 cells in one chain
6PercentagePerc%Barcelos e Ramos, Joanarelative number of cells per chain, more than 19 cells in one chain
7Growth rateµ1/dayBarcelos e Ramos, Joanabased on cell numbers
8Growth rateµ1/dayBarcelos e Ramos, Joanabased on POP
9Growth rateµ1/dayBarcelos e Ramos, Joanabased on PON
10Growth rateµ1/dayBarcelos e Ramos, Joanabased on POC
11Particulate organic phosphorus per cellPOP cellpmol/#Barcelos e Ramos, Joana
12Particulate organic carbon content per cellPOC contpmol/#Barcelos e Ramos, Joana
13Particulate organic nitrogen per cellPON cellpmol/#Barcelos e Ramos, Joana
14Production of particulate organic phosphorus, per cellPOP prodpmol/#/dayBarcelos e Ramos, Joana
15Production of particulate organic carbon per cellPOC prodpg/#/dayBarcelos e Ramos, Joana
16Production of particulate organic nitrogenPON prodpg/#/dayBarcelos e Ramos, Joana
17Carbon/Nitrogen ratioC/NBarcelos e Ramos, Joana
18Carbon/Phosphorus ratioC/PBarcelos e Ramos, Joana
19Nitrogen/Phosphorus ratioN/PBarcelos e Ramos, Joana
20Carbon, organic, dissolved exudation, per cellDOC exudpmol/#Barcelos e Ramos, Joana
21Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgBarcelos e Ramos, JoanaPotentiometric titration
22pHpHBarcelos e Ramos, JoanaPotentiometrictotal scale
23Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgBarcelos e Ramos, JoanaCalculated using CO2SYS
24Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgBarcelos e Ramos, JoanaCalculated using CO2SYS
25Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgBarcelos e Ramos, JoanaCalculated using CO2SYS
26Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgBarcelos e Ramos, JoanaCalculated using CO2SYS
27Temperature, waterTemp°CBarcelos e Ramos, Joana
28SalinitySalBarcelos e Ramos, Joana
29Carbonate system computation flagCSC flagNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
30Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
31Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
32Fugacity of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)fCO2water_SST_wetµatmNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
33Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
34Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
35Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
36Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
37Calcite saturation stateOmega CalNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
Size:
616 data points

Download Data

Download dataset as tab-delimited text (use the following character encoding: )

View dataset as HTML