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Razik, Sebastian; Chiessi, Cristiano Mazur; Romero, Oscar E; von Dobeneck, Tilo (2013): Sedimentological, geochemical, micropaleontological and rock magnetic proxies of sediment core GeoB6211-2. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.805136, Supplement to: Razik, S et al. (2013): Interaction of the South American Monsoon System and the Southern Westerly Wind Belt during the last 14 kyr. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 374, 28-40, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2012.12.022

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Abstract:
Surface currents and sediment distribution of the SE South American upper continental margin are under influence of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS) and the Southern Westerly Wind Belt (SWWB). Both climatic systems determine the meridional position of the Subtropical Shelf Front (STSF) and probably also of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence (BMC). We reconstruct the changing impact of the SAMS and the SWWB on sediment composition at the upper Rio Grande Cone off southern Brazil during the last 14 cal kyr combining sedimentological, geochemical, micropaleontological and rock magnetic proxies of marine sediment core GeoB 6211-2. Sharp reciprocal changes in ferri- and paramagnetic mineral content and prominent grain-size shifts give strong clues to systematic source changes and transport modes of these mostly terrigenous sediments. Our interpretations support the assumption that the SAMS over SE South America was weaker than today during most of the Late Glacial and entire Early Holocene, while the SWWB was contracted to more southern latitudes, resembling modern austral summer-like conditions. In consequence, the STSF and the BMC were driven to more southern positions than today's, favoring the deposition of Fe-rich but weakly magnetic La Plata River silts at the Rio Grande Cone. During the Mid Holocene, the northern boundary of the SWWB migrated northward, while the STSF reached its northernmost position of the last 14 cal kyr and the BMC most likely arrived at its modern position. This shift enabled the transport of Antarctic diatoms and more strongly magnetic Argentinean shelf sands to the Rio Grande Cone, while sediment contributions from the La Plata River became less important. During the Late Holocene, the modern El Niño Southern Oscillation set in and the SAMS and the austral tradewinds intensified, causing a southward shift of the STSF to its modern position. This reinforced a significant deposition of La Plata River silts at the Rio Grande Cone. These higher magnetic silts with intermediate Fe contents mirror the modern more humid terrestrial climatic conditions over SE South America.
Related to:
Müller, Peter J (2004): Carbon and nitrogen data of sediment core GeoB6211-2. Department of Geosciences, Bremen University, PANGAEA, https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.137054
Müller, Peter J (2004): Density and water content of sediment core GeoB6211-2. Department of Geosciences, Bremen University, PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.137022
Coverage:
Latitude: -32.505200 * Longitude: -50.242700
Date/Time Start: 1999-12-12T17:21:00 * Date/Time End: 1999-12-12T17:21:00
Event(s):
GeoB6211-2 * Latitude Start: -32.505200 * Longitude Start: -50.242700 * Latitude End: -32.505200 * Longitude End: -50.242700 * Date/Time: 1999-12-12T17:21:00 * Elevation Start: -657.0 m * Elevation End: -657.0 m * Recovery: 7.74 m * Location: Argentine Basin * Campaign: M46/2 * Basis: Meteor (1986) * Device: Gravity corer (Kiel type) (SL)
Size:
12 datasets

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Datasets listed in this publication series

  1. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 4a) Median grain size of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.804845
  2. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 4c) Calcium carbonate of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.804917
  3. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 4d) Antarctic diatom abundances of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.804971
  4. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 4e) Iron carbonate-free concentrations from powder samples of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.805043
  5. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 4e) Iron carbonate-free intensities of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.805046
  6. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 4f) Magnetic susceptibility measured every 1 cm of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.805096
  7. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 4f) Magnetic susceptibility measured on distinct samples at 5 cm interval of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.805099
  8. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 4g) Carbonate-free mass-specific Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.805102
  9. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 4h) Susceptibility carbonate-free/iron carbonate-free ratio of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.805109
  10. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 5) Grain size distribution of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.804855
  11. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Figure 7) Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization carbonate-free/iron carbonate-free ratio of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.805111
  12. Razik, S; Chiessi, CM; Romero, OE et al. (2013): (Table 1 and Figure 3) Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dates and calibrated ages used in the age-depth model of sediment core GeoB6211-2. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.804842