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Dupont, Sam; Dorey, Narimane; Stumpp, Meike; Melzner, Frank; Thorndyke, Mike (2012): Seawater carbonate chemistry and Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis larval and juvenile survival and reporductive processes, 2012. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.778150, Supplement to: Dupont, S et al. (2013): Long-term and trans-life-cycle effects of exposure to ocean acidification in the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. Marine Biology, 160(8), 1835-1843, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-012-1921-x

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Abstract:
Anthropogenic CO2 emissions are acidifying the world's oceans. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that ocean acidification can impact survival, growth, development and physiology of marine invertebrates. Here we tested the impact of long term (up to 16 months) and trans life-cycle (adult, embryo/larvae and juvenile) exposure to elevated pCO2 (1200 µatm, compared to control 400 µatm) on the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. Female fecundity was decreased 4.5 fold when acclimated to elevated pCO2 for 4 months during reproductive conditioning while no difference was observed in females acclimated for 16 months. Moreover, adult pre-exposure for 4 months to elevated pCO2, had a direct negative impact on subsequent larval settlement success. Five to nine times fewer offspring reached the juvenile stage in cultures using gametes collected from adults previously acclimated to high pCO2 for 4 months. However, no difference in larval survival was observed when adults were pre-exposed for 16 months to elevated pCO2. pCO2 had no direct negative impact on juvenile survival except when both larvae and juveniles were raised in elevated pCO2. These negative effects on settlement success and juvenile survival can be attributed to carry-over effects from adults to larvae and from larvae to juveniles. Our results support the contention that adult sea urchins can acclimate to moderately elevated pCO2 in a matter of a few months and that carry-over effects can exacerbate the negative impact of ocean acidification on larvae and juveniles.
Keyword(s):
Animalia; Benthic animals; Benthos; Coast and continental shelf; Containers and aquaria (20- 1000 L or < 1 m**2); Echinodermata; Laboratory experiment; Mortality/Survival; North Atlantic; Reproduction; Single species; Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis; Temperate
Further details:
Lavigne, Héloise; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre (2011): seacarb: seawater carbonate chemistry with R. R package version 2.4. https://cran.r-project.org/package=seacarb
Comment:
In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Lavigne and Gattuso, 2011) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI).
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethodComment
1IdentificationIDDupont, Sam
2Experimental treatmentExp treatDupont, Sam
3CommentCommentDupont, Sam
4SpeciesSpeciesDupont, Sam
5SalinitySalDupont, Sam
6Temperature, waterTemp°CDupont, Sam
7Alkalinity, totalATmmol(eq)/lDupont, SamMeasured after Sarazin et al 1999
8Alkalinity, totalATµmol/kgDupont, SamCalculated
9pHpHDupont, SampH meter (827 Metrohm)NBS scale
10Strongylocentrotus droebachiensisS. droebachiensis#/lDupont, SamLarvae
11Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, fecundityS. droebachiensiseggs/femaleDupont, SamMicroscopy
12Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, fecundity, standard deviationS. droebachiensis std dev±Dupont, Sam
13Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, egg, diameterS. droebachiensis egg diamµmDupont, SamMicroscopy
14Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, egg, diameter, standard deviationS. droebachiensis egg diam std dev±Dupont, Sam
15Strongylocentrotus droebachiensisS. droebachiensis#/lDupont, SamJuvenile
16Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, standard deviationS. droebachiensis std dev±Dupont, SamJuvenile
17Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, larval, daily mortalityS. droebachiensis mortality%/dayDupont, Sam
18Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, larval, daily mortality, standard deviationS. droebachiensis mortality std dev±Dupont, Sam
19SurvivalSurvival%Dupont, Sam
20Survival rate, standard deviationSurvival rate std dev±Dupont, Sam
21Carbonate system computation flagCSC flagNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
22pHpHNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)Total scale
23Carbon dioxideCO2µmol/kgNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
24Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)pCO2water_SST_wetµatmNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
25Fugacity of carbon dioxide (water) at sea surface temperature (wet air)fCO2water_SST_wetµatmNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
26Bicarbonate ion[HCO3]-µmol/kgNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
27Carbonate ion[CO3]2-µmol/kgNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
28Carbon, inorganic, dissolvedDICµmol/kgNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
29Aragonite saturation stateOmega ArgNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
30Calcite saturation stateOmega CalNisumaa, Anne-MarinCalculated using seacarb after Nisumaa et al. (2010)
Size:
280 data points

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