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Hovan, Steven A; Rea, David K (1992): Cenozoic record of continental mineral deposit on Broken and Ninetyeast Ridges, Indian Ocean. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.729718, Supplement to: Hovan, SA; Rea, DK (1992): The Cenozoic record of continental mineral deposition on Broken and Ninetyeast Ridges, Indian Ocean: Southern African aridity and sediment delivery from the Himalayas. Paleoceanography, 7(6), 833-860, https://doi.org/10.1029/92PA02176

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Abstract:
The mineral component of pelagic sediments recovered from the Indian Ocean provides both a history of eolian deposition related to climatic changes in southern Africa and a record of terrigenous input related to sediment delivery from the Himalayas. A composite Cenozoic dust flux record from four sites in the central Indian Ocean is used to define the evolution of the Kalahari and Namib desert source regions. The overall record of dust input is one of very low flux for much of the Cenozoic indicating a long history of climate stability and regional hyperaridity. The most significant reduction in dust flux occurred near the Paleocene/Eocene boundary and is interpreted as a shift from semiarid climates during the Paleocene to more arid conditions in the early Eocene. Further aridification is recorded as stepwise reductions in the input of dust material which occur from about 35 to 40 Ma, 27 to 32 Ma, and 13 to 15 Ma and correlate to significant enrichments in benthic foraminifer delta18O values. The mineral flux in sediments from the northern Indian Ocean, site 758, records changes in the terrigenous input apparently related to the erosion of the Himalayas and indicates a rapid late Cenozoic uplift history. Three major pulses of increased terrigeneous sediment flux are inferred from the depositional record. The initial increase began at about 9.5 Ma and continued for roughly 1.0 million years. A second pulse with approximately the same magnitude occurred from about 7.0 to 5.6 Ma. The largest pulse of enhanced terrigenous influx occurred during the Pliocene from about 3.9 to 2.0 Ma when average flux values were severalfold greater than at any other time in the Cenozoic.
Coverage:
Median Latitude: -8.309167 * Median Longitude: 88.347367 * South-bound Latitude: -27.356000 * West-bound Longitude: 86.791700 * North-bound Latitude: 5.384200 * East-bound Longitude: 90.361200
Date/Time Start: 1972-02-13T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 1988-06-24T13:30:00
Event(s):
121-756A * Latitude: -27.356000 * Longitude: 87.596800 * Date/Time Start: 1988-05-25T20:49:00 * Date/Time End: 1988-05-26T04:00:00 * Elevation: -1529.0 m * Penetration: 9.7 m * Recovery: 9.72 m * Location: South Indian Ridge, South Indian Ocean * Campaign: Leg121 * Basis: Joides Resolution * Method/Device: Drilling/drill rig (DRILL) * Comment: 1 core; 9.7 m cored; 0 m drilled; 100.2 % recovery
121-757A * Latitude: -17.024000 * Longitude: 88.181600 * Date/Time Start: 1988-06-01T02:10:00 * Date/Time End: 1988-06-01T11:00:00 * Elevation: -1661.0 m * Penetration: 9.4 m * Recovery: 9.4 m * Location: South Indian Ridge, South Indian Ocean * Campaign: Leg121 * Basis: Joides Resolution * Method/Device: Drilling/drill rig (DRILL) * Comment: 1 core; 9.4 m cored; 0 m drilled; 100 % recovery
121-758A * Latitude: 5.384200 * Longitude: 90.361200 * Date/Time Start: 1988-06-15T23:50:00 * Date/Time End: 1988-06-24T13:30:00 * Elevation: -2935.0 m * Penetration: 676.8 m * Recovery: 453.83 m * Location: Indian Ocean * Campaign: Leg121 * Basis: Joides Resolution * Method/Device: Drilling/drill rig (DRILL) * Comment: 73 cores; 676.8 m cored; 0 m drilled; 67.1 % recovery
Size:
6 datasets

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