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Huber, Robert; Meggers, Helge; Baumann, Karl-Heinz; Henrich, Rüdiger (2000): Carbon and carbonate concentrations of recent and Pleistocene sediments of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.704663, Supplement to: Huber, R et al. (2000): Recent and Pleistocene carbonate dissolution in sediments of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea. Marine Geology, 165(1-4), 123-136, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0025-3227(99)00138-3

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Abstract:
Surface sediment samples from the Norwegian-Greenland Sea were investigated to reconstruct the spatial distribution of recent carbonate dissolution on the seafloor. Additionally, carbonate dissolution records of Ocean Drilling Program sites 985 and 987 are presented to outline the development of Pleistocene carbonate preservation.
Today, well-preserved carbonate tests can be observed along the inflow of warm Atlantic surface water, extending as far as into the northernmost Norwegian-Greenland Sea. Increased dissolution is indicated along the continental margins and in the deepest parts of the Greenland Basin. Factors favoring carbonate preservation were found to be supersaturation of the water column with respect to calcium carbonate, high carbonate rain and probably excess alkalinity of bottom waters supplied by the arctic river discharge. Supralysoklinal dissolution is most important for recent carbonate dissolution in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, whereas the deepest parts of the Greenland Basin reaches the calcite saturation horizon.
Pleistocene dissolution records show some prominent peaks of extreme carbonate dissolution. During the Brunhes chron, carbonate dissolution maxima can be related to meltwater pulses, which probably inhibited deep-water formation in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea during deglaciation events. Long-term severe carbonate dissolution is evident during the late Matuyama chron. This can be probably related to low carbonate rain, due to a more eastwards located East Greenland Current and the nearly absence of the not yet polar adapted Neogloboquadrina pachyderma sin. during that period. Extreme dissolution events during the late Matuyama indicate strongly reduced deep-water formation.
Project(s):
Coverage:
Median Latitude: 68.126600 * Median Longitude: -10.278900 * South-bound Latitude: 66.941400 * West-bound Longitude: -17.936400 * North-bound Latitude: 70.496700 * East-bound Longitude: -6.450000
Date/Time Start: 1995-08-03T13:58:00 * Date/Time End: 1995-08-26T22:50:00
Event(s):
162-985A * Latitude: 66.941400 * Longitude: -6.450300 * Date/Time Start: 1995-08-03T13:58:00 * Date/Time End: 1995-08-07T04:15:00 * Elevation: -2788.0 m * Penetration: 587.9 m * Recovery: 553.42 m * Location: Norwegian Sea * Campaign: Leg162 * Basis: Joides Resolution * Method/Device: Drilling/drill rig (DRILL) * Comment: 62 cores; 587.9 m cored; 0 m drilled; 94.1 % recovery
162-985B * Latitude: 66.941700 * Longitude: -6.450000 * Date/Time Start: 1995-08-07T04:15:00 * Date/Time End: 1995-08-07T19:15:00 * Elevation: -2879.0 m * Penetration: 126.9 m * Recovery: 129.44 m * Location: Norwegian Sea * Campaign: Leg162 * Basis: Joides Resolution * Method/Device: Drilling/drill rig (DRILL) * Comment: 14 cores; 126.9 m cored; 0 m drilled; 102 % recovery
162-987D * Latitude: 70.496700 * Longitude: -17.936400 * Date/Time Start: 1995-08-24T21:45:00 * Date/Time End: 1995-08-26T22:50:00 * Elevation: -1673.0 m * Penetration: 373 m * Recovery: 268.46 m * Location: Iceland Sea * Campaign: Leg162 * Basis: Joides Resolution * Method/Device: Drilling/drill rig (DRILL) * Comment: 42 cores; 373 m cored; 0 m drilled; 72 % recovery
Comment:
Further relevant data: Huber et al. (2000) data set: doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.704662
Size:
3 datasets

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