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Mix, Alan C; Morey, Ann E; Pisias, Nicklas G; Hostetler, Steven W (1999): Foraminiferal faunal estimates of paleotemperature: Circumventing the no-analog problem yields cool ice age tropics. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.692130, Supplement to: Mix, AC et al. (1999): Foraminiferal faunal estimates of paleotemperature: Circumventing the no-analog problem yields cool ice age tropics. Paleoceanography, 14(3), 350-359, https://doi.org/10.1029/1999PA900012

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Abstract:
The sensitivity of the tropics to climate change, particularly the amplitude of glacial-to-interglacial changes in sea surface temperature (SST), is one of the great controversies in paleoclimatology. Here we reassess faunal estimates of ice age SSTs, focusing on the problem of no-analog planktonic foraminiferal assemblages in the equatorial oceans that confounds both classical transfer function and modern analog methods. A new calibration strategy developed here, which uses past variability of species to define robust faunal assemblages, solves the no-analog problem and reveals ice age cooling of 5° to 6°C in the equatorial current systems of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Oceans. Classical transfer functions underestimated temperature changes in some areas of the tropical oceans because core-top assemblages misrepresented the ice age faunal assemblages. Our finding is consistent with some geochemical estimates and model predictions of greater ice age cooling in the tropics than was inferred by Climate: Long-Range Investigation, Mapping, and Prediction (CLIMAP) [1981] and thus may help to resolve a long-standing controversy. Our new foraminiferal transfer function suggests that such cooling was limited to the equatorial current systems, however, and supports CLIMAP's inference of stability of the subtropical gyre centers.
Coverage:
Median Latitude: -2.103458 * Median Longitude: -82.051681 * South-bound Latitude: -64.550000 * West-bound Longitude: 4.650000 * North-bound Latitude: 76.817000 * East-bound Longitude: -0.363000
Date/Time Start: 1874-06-13T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 1991-05-24T06:08:00
Event(s):
138-846B * Latitude: -3.094930 * Longitude: -90.817960 * Date/Time Start: 1991-05-21T17:00:00 * Date/Time End: 1991-05-24T06:08:00 * Elevation: -3295.8 m * Penetration: 422.4 m * Recovery: 373.44 m * Location: South Pacific Ocean * Campaign: Leg138 * Basis: Joides Resolution * Device: Drilling/drill rig (DRILL) * Comment: 45 cores; 422.4 m cored; 0 m drilled; 88.4 % recovery
A152-84 * Latitude: 44.349800 * Longitude: -30.267000 * Date/Time: 1960-01-01T00:00:00 * Elevation: -2750.0 m * Campaign: A150/180 * Device: Piston corer (PC) * Comment: Project/Cruise uncertain
A153-154 * Latitude: 28.000000 * Longitude: -38.783000 * Date/Time: 1960-01-01T00:00:00 * Elevation: -4020.0 m * Location: Atlantic * Campaign: A150/180 * Device: Piston corer (PC) * Comment: Project/Cruise uncertain
Size:
14 datasets

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Datasets listed in this publication series

  1. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Calculated sea surface temperatures for the last glacial maximum. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61222
  2. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Composition of planktonic foraminifera species from 310 sediments samples during the last glacial maximum. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61208
  3. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Composition of planktonic foraminifera species in 1123 surface sediment samples compared with sea surface temperatures from the Levitus Atlas. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61061
  4. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Distribution of planktic foraminifers of core 138-846B. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61063
  5. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Distribution of planktic foraminifers of core RC10-62. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61064
  6. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Distribution of planktic foraminifers of core RC13-110. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61065
  7. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Distribution of planktic foraminifers of core RC24-16. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61066
  8. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Distribution of planktic foraminifers of core V19-29. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61067
  9. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Distribution of planktic foraminifers of core V22-174. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61068
  10. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Distribution of planktic foraminifers of core V30-36. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61069
  11. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Distribution of planktic foraminifers of core V30-40. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61070
  12. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Distribution of planktic foraminifers of core Y71-06-12. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61071
  13. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Distribution of planktic foraminifers of core Y71-09-101. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61072
  14. Mix, AC; Morey, AE; Pisias, NG et al. (1999): Sea surface temperature reconstructed from foraminifera in surface sediments at stations A180-072 to VNTR01-8PC. https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.61221