Not logged in
PANGAEA.
Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

Sayles, Frederick L; Martin, William R; Deuser, Werner G (1994): Oxygen flux in surface sediments (Table 1). PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.53388

Always quote citation above when using data! You can download the citation in several formats below.

RIS CitationBibTeX CitationShow MapGoogle Earth

Abstract:
Over the past decade an increasing body of evidence has accumulated indicating that much, perhaps most, of the deep sea floor is an environment of substantial temporal variability (Smith and Baldwin, 1984 doi:10.1038/307624a0; Smith, 1987; Deuser and Ross, 1980 doi:10.1038/283364a0; Thiel et al., 1988). This variability is driven largely by seasonal changes of processes occurring in the surface waters (Smith, 1987; Deuser and Ross, 1980; Billett et al., 1983 doi:10.1038/302520a0). The coupling of the deep sea floor environment to the surface waters is the result of rapid vertical transport of particulate matter through the water column (Honjo, 1982 doi:10.1126/science.218.4575.883; Deuser et al., 1986 doi:10.1016/0198-0149(86)90120-2; Lampitt, 1985 doi:10.1016/0198-0149(85)90034-2), affording only limited time for degradation before arrival at the sea floor. Studies in the Pacific Ocean have indicated that temporal variations in particulate organic carbon fluxes to the sea floor are accompanied by temporal variability in sediment oxygen demand by as much as a factor of four (Smith and Baldwin, 1984; Smith, 1987). We report here time-series studies of oxygen fluxes into the sediments of the oligotrophic Atlantic near Bermuda which contrast sharply with these previous reports. At the Bermuda site, despite large seasonal variations in particulate organic carbon fluxes, in situ measured sediment oxygen consumption does not vary significantly. These results imply that large areas of the sea floor may be characterized by seasonally invariant sediment oxygen demand.
Coverage:
Latitude: 31.833333 * Longitude: -64.166667
Date/Time Start: 1989-03-21T00:00:00 * Date/Time End: 1992-10-21T00:00:00
Minimum DEPTH, sediment/rock: m * Maximum DEPTH, sediment/rock: m
Event(s):
S_BATS-12 * Latitude: 31.833333 * Longitude: -64.166667 * Date/Time: 1991-06-04T00:00:00 * Elevation: -4400.0 m * Campaign: ADEPDCruises * Method/Device: In situ benthic flux chamber (ISBFC) * Comment: In Situ Benthic Flux Chamber
S_BATS-14 * Latitude: 31.833333 * Longitude: -64.166667 * Date/Time: 1991-07-24T00:00:00 * Elevation: -4400.0 m * Campaign: ADEPDCruises * Method/Device: In situ benthic flux chamber (ISBFC) * Comment: In Situ Benthic Flux Chamber
S_BATS-15 * Latitude: 31.833333 * Longitude: -64.166667 * Date/Time: 1991-11-02T00:00:00 * Elevation: -4400.0 m * Campaign: ADEPDCruises * Method/Device: In situ benthic flux chamber (ISBFC) * Comment: In Situ Benthic Flux Chamber
Parameter(s):
#NameShort NameUnitPrincipal InvestigatorMethod/DeviceComment
1Event labelEvent
2Latitude of eventLatitude
3Longitude of eventLongitude
4Date/Time of eventDate/Time
5DEPTH, sediment/rockDepthmGeocode
6--Sayles, Frederick LSequential day
7Duration, number of daysDurationdaysSayles, Frederick L
8Oxygen flux, sediment oxygen demandSODmmol/m2/daySayles, Frederick LBenthic flux chamber (BFC)
9Oxygen flux, standard deviationO2 flux std dev±Sayles, Frederick LBenthic flux chamber (BFC)
Size:
35 data points

Download Data

Download dataset as tab-delimited text (use the following character encoding: )

View dataset as HTML